Ironmaking by Blast Furnace and Carbon di Oxide Emissions Jan14

Ironmaking by Blast Furnace and Carbon di Oxide Emissions...

Ironmaking by Blast Furnace and Carbon di Oxide Emissions It is widely recognised that carbon di-oxide (CO2) in the atmosphere is the main component influencing global warming through the green-house effect. Since 1896 the concentration of CO2 in the atmosphere has increased by 25 %. The iron and steel industry is known as an energy intensive industry and as a significant emitter of CO2. Hence, climate change is identified by the iron and steel industry as a major environmental challenge. Long before the findings of the Inter-governmental Panel on Climate Change in 2007, major producers of iron and steel recognized that long term solutions are needed to tackle the CO2 emissions from the iron and steel industry. Therefore, the iron and steel industry has been highly proactive in improving energy consumption and reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. In the present environment of the climate change, within the iron and steel industry, there is a constant drive to reduce energy costs, reduce emissions and ensure maximum waste energy re-use. In the traditional processes for producing iron and steel, emission of CO2 is inevitable, especially for the blast furnace (BF) process, which requires carbon (C) as a fuel and reducing agent to convert iron oxide to the metallic state, and hence is the main process for the generation of CO2 in an integrated iron and steel plant. Climate policy is in fact, an important driver for further development of the ironmaking technology by BF. Critically, amongst the challenges facing the BF operation is decarbonization. Significant steps have been made by the iron and steel industry to increase the thermal efficiency of the BF operation, but ultimately there is a hard limit in decarbonization, associated with the need for C as a chemical reductant. Since the 1950s,...

Waste Plastics injection in a Blast Furnace Nov14

Waste Plastics injection in a Blast Furnace...

Waste Plastics injection in a Blast Furnace The recycling of waste plastics (WP) by injecting them in a blast furnace (BF) is being practiced in few BFs especially in japan and Europe. The use of plastics in the BF also recovers energy from the WP and so it is sometimes considered as energy recovery. BF based ironmaking processes can utilize WP by any of the following methods. Carbonization with coal to produce coke. Top charging into the BF, although this generates unwanted tar from the decomposition of the plastics in the shaft. Gasifying the plastics outside the BF. The resultant synthesis gas is then injected through the tuyeres. Injection as a solid through the tuyeres in a similar way to pulverized coal (PC). Normally it is done as a co-injection of WP and coal into the BF. The first attempt for the waste plastics injection (WPI) in a BF was made at the Bremen Steel Works in 1994, with commercial injection starting a year later. The first integrated system for injecting plastic wastes was at NKK’s (now JFE Steel) Keihin Works in Japan. Injecting WP into BF has several environmental, operational and economic advantages. These include the following. Reduction in the amount of plastic wastes being landfilled or incinerated. Lower consumption of both coke and PC, thus saving coal resources. However, neither WP nor PC can completely replace coke. The amount of coke replaced in the BF is partly dependent on the quality of the WP. There is energy resource savings. The benefit of saved resources from mixed WPI is around 11 giga calories per ton (Gcal/t). There is decrease in the carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions since the combustion energy of WP is generally at least as high as that of PC normally injected,...