Mini Blast Furnace and Iron making Oct10

Mini Blast Furnace and Iron making...

Mini Blast Furnace and Iron making Mini blast furnaces (MBF) are generally viewed as miniature versions of the conventional large blast furnaces (BF). These furnaces are ideally suited for small scale operations. In fact, they are basically the forerunner to modern conventional last blast furnaces and hence they have operated for a longer period of time. MBFs are located in many countries but the majority of the MBFs are located in China, India, Brazil and Indonesia. Plant availability as well as the perfection achieved in this technology has made MBF an accepted route for iron making. Further, these days, most of the technologies of design, burdening and operation which have become the norm for today’s modern large furnaces have also been adopted in MBFs. MBF is a vertical shaft furnace with a crucible like hearth. Burden materials consisting of iron ore, coke or charcoal used as a reducing agent as well as fuel, and fluxes, usually limestone or dolomite, are charged into the top of the furnace. The furnace works on the principle of a counter current reactor. As the burden descends through the shaft, it is preheated and pre-reduced by the hot gases ascending from the furnace bottom. The gases are generated by introducing hot air blast enriched with oxygen through tuyeres. The hot blast burns the reducing agent, producing reducing gases and heat required for the reduction process taking place in the furnace. The reduced burden material melts to form HM (liquid iron) which becomes saturated with carbon and descends to the hearth. The fluxes combine with the impurities in the burden materials to produce a molten slag which accumulates on top of the liquid iron in the hearth. Liquid iron and liquid slag are periodically tapped from the furnace. MBF exhibits...

Air Blast System for Blast Furnace Jan29

Air Blast System for Blast Furnace...

Air Blast System for Blast Furnace A blast furnace (BF) produces liquid iron (hot metal) by the reduction of ore burden with reducing gases. The reducing gases are produced by the reaction of oxygen with coke and coal. This oxygen is part of enriched hot air blast which is blown and distributed at the bottom of the BF through the straight pipes, blowpipes and the tuyeres. This set is connected to the main bustle pipe. The volume of air which is enriched with oxygen and blown for the process in the BF to take place is provided by the air blowers. These air blowers take the air from atmosphere and compress it to the required pressure. This compressed air which is at about up to 200 deg C temperatures after compression is enriched with oxygen and blown into the hot stoves where the temperature is raised up to 1.200 to 1250 deg C. This hot blast air is then taken to bustle pipe through hot blast main. Air blast systems of modern high capacity blast furnaces operate with blast temperatures of up to 1350 deg C and blast pressures up to 5 kg/sq cm (g). The whole process is typically shown in Fig 1. Fig 1 Schematics of typical air blast system The main components of an air blast system of a blast furnace consist of (i) air blower, (ii) cold blast main, (iii) hot blast stove along with its combustion system, (iv) hot blast main, (v) bustle pipe, (vi) blow pipes and tuyeres known as tuyere stocks, (vii) set of valves, and (viii) control instruments. The air blower is the first equipment in the air blast system. It is located in the blower house and is meant for providing cold air blast to the...