Hot Metal

Hot Metal Hot metal (HM) is the output of a blast furnace (BF). It is liquid iron which is produced by the reduction of descending ore burden (iron ore lump, sinter, and pellet) by the ascending reducing gases. HM gets collected in the hearth of the BF. From the hearth, the HM is tapped from the taphole of the BF after an interval of time. Normally in large BFs, HM tapping rates of 7 ton/min and liquid tapping velocities of 5 m/sec, in tap holes of 70 mm diameter and 3.5 m long, are typically encountered. The tapping rate of HM is strongly influenced by the taphole condition and taphole length. Generally the temperature of tapped HM varies in the range of 1420 deg C to 1480 deg C. The tapped HM is handled in the two stages namely (i) handling of the HM in the cast house i.e. from taphole to the hot metal ladles (open top or torpedo), and (ii) transport of HM ladles to the point of HM consumption. Presently most of the HM is consumed within integrated steel plants for steel making. The HM is transferred to the steel melting shop for making of steel. The HM which is not sent for steel making is cast into pig iron in pig casting machine for use in steel making later as cold charge or is sold to foundries or to mini steel plants having induction furnaces as merchant pig iron. HM can also be granulated by a process which is known as ‘Granshot’ process. Presently the Granshot plants for the production of GPI are working at six places namely (i) Uddeholm, Sweden, (ii) SSAB Lulea, Sweden, (iii) Voest Alpine, Donawitz, (iv) Saldanha steel, South Africa, (v) SSAB Oxelosund, Sweden, and (vi)...