Blast Furnace Cast House Equipments May16

Blast Furnace Cast House Equipments...

Blast Furnace Cast House Equipments The cast house floor of a blast furnace has always been one of the most dangerous working places in a blast furnace. Apart from working in an atmosphere which includes toxic gases, fumes, and dust, the operators have to perform hard and heavy manual work close to hot metal and slag runners and ladles filled with hot metal. Before the invention and installation of cast house equipment, the tapholes were opened and closed manually. Opening was done by means of steel bars and sledgehammers, whereas the taphole was closed by repeatedly ramming small amounts of clay or refractory material into the taphole, again with the help of long, heavy bars. In addition, on blast furnace, the blast had to be stopped, since it was impossible to close the taphole properly against the blast furnace pressure. This stoppage of the blast resulted in regular losses of production. Samuel W. Vaughen of USA invented the first mud gun in 1895. His pneumatic mud gun machine operated with steam, had a detachable nozzle that had to be swung open to load the taphole mass. In 1901 there was another big change in taphole practices when Ernst Menne of Germany invented the oxygen lance. By blowing oxygen through a 1/8 inch pipe and igniting it, it was now possible to open the taphole very quickly compared to the pure manual method. The first records of taphole drills is found around 1921 when Edgar E. Brosius and Joseph E. Judy of USA suggested a method of drilling the taphole for its opening. Brosius even invented a combined drilling and lancing apparatus in 1924. An excellent cast house setup is an important necessity for a low cost, high productivity blast furnace since an effective operation...