Ferro-Silicon

Ferro-Silicon Ferro-silicon (Fe-Si) is a metallic ferro-alloy having iron (Fe) and silicon (Si) as its main elements. In commercial terminology It is defined as a ferro-alloy containing 4 % or more of Fe, more than 8 % but not more than 96 % of Si, 3 % or less phosphorus (P), 30 % or less of manganese (Mn), less than 3 % of magnesium (Mg), and 10 % or less any other element. However, the regular grades of the ferro-alloy normally contain Si in the range of 15 % to 90 %. The usual Si contents in the Fe-Si available in the market are 15 %, 45 %, 65 %, 75 %, and 90 %. The remainder is Fe and minor elements. The minor elements, such as aluminum (Al), calcium (Ca), carbon (C), manganese (Mn), phosphorus (P), and sulphur (S) are present in small percentages in Fe-Si. Commercially, Fe-Si is differentiated by its grade and size. Fe-Si grades are defined by the percentages of Si and minor elements contained in the product. The principal characteristic is the percentage of Si contained in the ferro-alloy and the grades are referred to primarily by reference to that percentage. Hence 75 % Fe-Si contains around 75 % of Si in it. Fe-Si grades are further defined by the percentages of minor elements present in the product. ‘Regular grade 75 % Fe-Si’ denote that the product containing the indicated percentages of Si and recognized maximum percentages of minor elements. Other grades of Fe-Si differ from regular grades by having more restrictive limits on the content of elements such as Al, titanium (Ti), and/or Ca in the ferro-alloy. Fe-Si is also produced in a grade that contains controlled amounts of minor elements for the purpose of adding them to...

Silico- Manganese

Silico- Manganese Silico-manganese (Si-Mn) is a metallic ferro alloy which is being used to add both silicon (Si) and manganese (Mn) as ladle addition during steelmaking. Because of its lower carbon (C) content, it is a preferred ladle addition material during making of low carbon steels. Si-Mn is a ferroalloy composed principally of Mn, Si, and Fe (iron), and normally contains much smaller proportions of minor elements, such as C, phosphorus (P), and sulphur (S). The ferroalloy is also sometimes referred to as ferro-silicon-manganese. Both Mn and Si play an important role in the manufacturing of steel as deoxidizing, desulphurizing, and alloying agents. Si is the primary and more powerful deoxidizer. Mn is a milder deoxidizer than Si but enhances the effectiveness of the latter due to the formation of stable manganese silicates and aluminates. It also serves as desulphurizer. Mn is used as an alloying element in almost all types of steel. Of particular interest is its modifying effect on the iron-carbon (Fe-C) system by increasing the hardenability of the steel. There are two families of Mn alloys one is called Si-Mn while the other is known as ferro-manganese (Fe-Mn). Si-Mn adds additional silicon in liquid steel which is a stronger deoxidizer and which also helps to improve some mechanical properties of steel. In each family, content of C can be controlled and lowered when producing low C grades. Around 93 % of all the Mn produced is in the form of Mn ferroalloys consists of the Fe-Mn grades and the Si-Mn grades. The Fe-Mn grades are high carbon (HC), medium carbon (MC), low-carbon (LC) and very low carbon (VLC), whereas the Si-Mn grades include medium carbon (MC) and low carbon (LC). The steel industry is the only consumer of these alloys. However...

Production of Silico-Manganese in a Submerged Arc Furnace Jun09

Production of Silico-Manganese in a Submerged Arc Furnace...

Production of Silico-Manganese in a Submerged Arc Furnace Silico-manganese (Si-Mn) is an alloy used for adding both silicon (Si) and manganese (Mn) to liquid steel during steelmaking at low carbon (C) content. A standard Si-Mn alloy contains 65 % to 70 % Mn, 15 % to 20 % Si and 1.5 % to 2 % C. Si-Mn alloy grades are medium carbon (MC) and low carbon (LC). The steelmaking industry is the only consumer of this alloy. Use of Si-Mn during steelmaking in place of a mix of high carbon ferro-manganese (Fe-Mn) alloy and ferro-silicon (Fe-Si) alloy is driven by economic considerations. Both Mn and Si are crucial constituents in steelmaking. They are used as deoxidizers, desulphurizers and alloying elements. Si is the primary deoxidizer. Mn is a milder deoxidizer than Si but enhances the effectiveness due to the formation of stable manganese silicates and aluminates. It also serves as desulphurizer. Manganese is used as an alloying element in almost all types of steel. Of particular interest is its modifying effect on the iron-carbon (Fe-C) system by increasing the hardenability of the steel. Si-Mn is produced by carbo-thermic reduction of oxidic raw materials in a three-phase, alternating current (AC), submerged arc furnace (SAF) which is also being used for the production of Fe-Mn. Operation of the process for the Si-Mn production is often more difficult than the Fe-Mn production process since higher process temperature is needed. The common sizes of the SAF used for the production of Si-Mn are normally in the range 9 MVA to 40 MVA producing 45 tons to 220 tons of Si-Mn per day. In the carbo-thermic reduction of oxidic raw materials, heat is just as essential for reduction as C is, due to the endothermic reduction reactions and a...

Steelmaking in Induction Furnace May24

Steelmaking in Induction Furnace...

Steelmaking in Induction Furnace Coreless induction furnaces have been used in the ferrous industry for over 50 years and are now one of the most popular means of melting and holding ferrous materials. Induction melting had dramatic growth during the 1960s based on line frequency technology, and later with the large-scale introduction of medium frequency power supply during the 1980s. Making of mild steel in the induction furnace was first experimented during early 1980s and it gained popularity when the production of sponge iron utilizing coal based process of rotary kilns became popular. Induction furnace is a type of electric melting furnace which uses electric current to melt metal. The principle of induction melting is that a high voltage electrical source from a primary coil induces a low voltage, high current in the metal (secondary coil). Induction heating is simply a method of transfer of the heat energy. Two laws which govern induction heating are (i) electromagnetic induction, and (ii) the joule effect. Coreless induction furnace comprises a relatively thin refractory crucible encircled by a water cooled copper coil excited from a single AC supply. When the coil is energized, the fluctuating axial magnetic field causes a current to flow in electrically conducting pieces of charge material within the crucible. The power induced in the charge depends on the physical properties of the material, the flux linking it and its geometric shape. Dependent on the resistivity of the material being melted, the coreless induction furnace converts electrical energy to heat the charge at an efficiency of between 50 % and 85 %, although furnace efficiency is further reduced by thermal losses from radiation from the melt surface and conduction through the furnace lining. Medium frequency induction furnaces which are commonly used for steelmaking use...

Alumina and its Role in Iron and Steelmaking...

Alumina and its Role in Iron and Steelmaking Alumina is a chemical compound of aluminum (Al) and oxygen (O2) with the chemical formula aluminum oxide (Al2O3). It is the most commonly occurring of several aluminum oxides. It is significant in its use to produce aluminum metal. It is being used as an abrasive material because of its hardness. It is also being used as a refractory material owing to its high melting point. Aluminum oxide is an amphoteric substance. It can react with both acids and bases, acting as an acid with a base and a base with an acid, neutralizing the other and producing a salt.  It is insoluble in water. Aluminum oxide has a white solid appearance and is odorless. The molar mass of aluminum oxide is 101.96 grams per mole. Specific gravity of alumina is 3.986. It is insoluble in water. Melting point of aluminum oxide is 2072 deg C while the boiling point is 2977 deg C. Alumina affects the processes of producing iron and steel during the production of iron and steel. Besides alumina is a very important refractory material for the lining of furnaces and vessels in iron and steel plants. Role of alumina in ironmaking Alumina during ironmaking enters the process through impurities in the input materials mainly iron ore. Alumina affects the sintering of iron ore. The most harmful effect of alumina is to worsen the RDI (reduction degradation index) value of sinter. RDI value increases as the alumina content rises. It is seen that within a 10 % to 10.5 % CaO content range, an increase of 0.1 % in the alumina content raises the RDI by 2 points. The strength and quality of sinter deteriorate as the alumina content rises. Alumina promotes the formation of SFCA (silico ferrite of calcium and aluminum), which is beneficial for sinter strength, but the strength of the ore components is lower, since a...