Cobalt in Steels

Cobalt in Steels  Cobalt (Co) (atomic number 27 and atomic weight 58.94) has density of 8.85 gm/cc. Melting point of Co is 1493 deg C and boiling point is 3100 deg C. At temperatures below 417 deg C cobalt exhibits a hexagonal close packed structure. Between 417  deg C and its melting point of 1493 deg C, Co has a face centered cubic (fcc) structure. Co is a magnetic metal with a curie temperature of 1121 deg C. The phase diagram of the Fe-Co binary system and is given at Fig 1. Fig 1 Fe-Co binary phase diagram Co is not a popular element which is commonly added to alloy steels. It does have some effects but these can also be achieved with other alloying elements such as molybdenum (Mo), and nickel (Ni) etc. at lower costs and mostly with better results. Due to this factor, Co does not find enough use in high tonnage low alloy steel production. However it does have some niche markets in steel. Co becomes highly radioactive when exposed to the intense radiation of nuclear reactors, and as a result, any stainless steel that is in nuclear service will have a restriction in the Co content which is  usually around 0.2 % maximum. Adding agents In the production of co bearing alloy steels, additions of Co during the steel making is made in the form of Co metal which is supplied to steel producers in the form of briquettes, granules, and broken electrolytic cathodes. Content of Co in these additive agents is usually in the range of 98 % to 99.9 %. Scrap of super alloys normally contains high percentage of Ni and hence is not used for the production of tool steels. However this scrap can be used...

Martensitic Stainless Steels...

Martensitic Stainless Steels Martensitic grades of stainless steel were developed in order to provide a group of stainless steels which are corrosion resistant and hardenable by heat treatment. Martensitic stainless steels are essentially Fe-Cr-C alloys and are similar to carbon or low alloy steels with a structure similar to the ferritic steels. However, due the addition of carbon, they can be hardened and strengthened by heat treatment, in a similar way to carbon steels. The main alloying elements are chromium (10.5 % to 18 %), molybdenum (0.2 % to 1 %), no nickel (except for two grades), and carbon (0.1 % to 1.2 %). Major grades in the family of martensitic group of stainless steels are given in Fig 1. Fig 1 Major grades of martensitic stainless steels History The characteristic body centered tetragonal martensitic microstructure was first observed by German microscopist Adolf Martens around 1890. In 1912, Elwood Haynes applied for a U.S. patent on a martensitic stainless steel alloy. This patent was not granted until 1919. Also in 1912, Harry Brearley of the Brown – Firth research laboratory in Sheffield, England, while seeking a corrosion resistant alloy for gun barrels, discovered and subsequently industrialized a martensitic stainless steel alloy. The discovery was announced two years later in a January 1915 newspaper article in The New York Times. Brearley applied for a US patent during 1915. Properties The structures of martensitic stainless steels are body centered tetragonal (bct) and they are classified as a hard ferro magnetic group. In the annealed condition, these steels have tensile yield strengths of around 275 N/sq mm and hence they can be machined, cold formed, or cold worked in this condition. These stainless steels have good ductility and toughness properties, which decrease as strength increases. Martensitic stainless steels can be moderately hardened by...