Steelmaking in Induction Furnace May24

Steelmaking in Induction Furnace...

Steelmaking in Induction Furnace Coreless induction furnaces have been used in the ferrous industry for over 50 years and are now one of the most popular means of melting and holding ferrous materials. Induction melting had dramatic growth during the 1960s based on line frequency technology, and later with the large-scale introduction of medium frequency power supply during the 1980s. Making of mild steel in the induction furnace was first experimented during early 1980s and it gained popularity when the production of sponge iron utilizing coal based process of rotary kilns became popular. Induction furnace is a type of electric melting furnace which uses electric current to melt metal. The principle of induction melting is that a high voltage electrical source from a primary coil induces a low voltage, high current in the metal (secondary coil). Induction heating is simply a method of transfer of the heat energy. Two laws which govern induction heating are (i) electromagnetic induction, and (ii) the joule effect. Coreless induction furnace comprises a relatively thin refractory crucible encircled by a water cooled copper coil excited from a single AC supply. When the coil is energized, the fluctuating axial magnetic field causes a current to flow in electrically conducting pieces of charge material within the crucible. The power induced in the charge depends on the physical properties of the material, the flux linking it and its geometric shape. Dependent on the resistivity of the material being melted, the coreless induction furnace converts electrical energy to heat the charge at an efficiency of between 50 % and 85 %, although furnace efficiency is further reduced by thermal losses from radiation from the melt surface and conduction through the furnace lining. Medium frequency induction furnaces which are commonly used for steelmaking use...

Iron and Types of Iron...

Iron and Types of Iron Iron is a chemical element with symbol Fe (from Latin word Ferrum). Its atomic number is 26 and atomic mass is 55.85. It has a melting point of 1538 deg C and boiling point of 2862 deg C. The density of iron is 7.87 grams/cu cm. It is a metal in the first transition series. Like the elements of other group 8 elements (ruthenium and osmium), iron exists in a wide range of oxidation states, ?2 to +6, although +2 and +3 are the most common. Iron as a common metal is mostly confused with other metals such as different types of steels. Iron is by mass the most common element on the earth, forming much of earth’s outer and inner core. It is the fourth most common element and the second most common metal in the earth crust. Steels contain over 95 % Fe. Elemental iron occurs in meteoroids and other low oxygen environments, but is reactive to oxygen and water. Fresh iron surfaces appear lustrous silvery-gray, but oxidize in normal air to give hydrated iron oxides, commonly known as rust. Unlike the metals which form passivating oxide layers, iron oxides occupy more volume than the metal and thus flake off, exposing fresh surfaces for corrosion. Iron objects have been found in Egypt dating from around 3500 BCE (Before Common Era). They contain around 7.5 % nickel, which indicates that they were of meteoric origin. The ancient Hittites of Asia Minor (today’s Turkey) were the first to smelt iron from its ores around 1500 BCE. The ‘Iron Age’ had begun at that time. The first person to explain the various types of iron was René Antoine Ferchault de Réaumur who wrote a book on the subject in 1722. This explained how steel, wrought iron, and cast iron, were to be distinguished by the amount of charcoal (carbon) they contained. The...

Coal based Direct Reduction Rotary Kiln Process Feb14

Coal based Direct Reduction Rotary Kiln Process...

Coal based Direct Reduction Rotary Kiln Process The coal based direct reduction rotary kiln process was developed for converting iron ore directly into metallic iron without the melting of the materials. The process has the advantage of low capital expenditure and no requirement of coking coal. The metallic iron in this process is produced by the reduction of iron oxide below the fusion temperature of iron ore (1535 deg C) by utilizing carbonaceous material present in the non-coking coal. As the iron ore is in direct contact with the reducing agent throughout the reduction process, it is often termed as direct reduced iron (DRI). The reduced product having high degree of metallization shows a ‘honeycomb structure’, due to which it is often called sponge iron. Coal based DRI plants are flexible with respect to plant location since non-coking coal is widely distributed in large deposits and is easy to transport. Most plants employ reduction process which is carried out in rotary kilns. These plants use wide variety of raw materials and non-coking coal. The quality of these materials has direct bearing on the process as well as the product. Some plants do not use iron ore directly. These plants use iron ore pellets in the rotary kiln. Raw material mix consisting of iron ore, dolomite and non-coking coal is fed at the one end of the rotary kiln and is heated by coal burners to produce DRI. The product DRI along with char (sometimes called dolo char) is taken out from the other end of the kiln. Apart from this, primary air and secondary air are supplied to the kiln to initiate the combustion and sustain the reaction process in the kiln. Raw materials The main raw materials for the production of DRI by...