Salamander Tapping for Capital Repairs of Blast Furnace Aug26

Salamander Tapping for Capital Repairs of Blast Furnace...

Salamander Tapping for Capital Repairs of Blast Furnace  A salamander means all liquid and solidified materials in the hearth of a blast furnace below the tap hole. The salamander includes liquid iron and slag and mixtures of solid iron, slag and coke/carbon. During the normal operation of the blast furnace, the furnace bottom and hearth contains the ‘dead-man’ and the salamander. When the blast furnace is to be relined, it is necessary that the furnace is emptied completely by removing all the constituents of the bottom and the hearth. It is also desirable to remove these constituents during partial relining of the furnace or during the repairs of the tap-hole. This provides safer working conditions during these partial repairs and prevents damage to the hearth refractories as a result of cyclic cooling and heating movements. The removal of all the constituents of the bottom and the hearth of the furnace is carried out usually by salamander tapping. The salamander tapping is usually done at preferably the lowest level where liquid iron can be expected in the blast furnace hearth. Salamander tapping of a blast furnace is the final tapping after the furnace is blown down in order to drain the last liquid iron from the furnace hearth. Because of its rare occurrence a salamander tapping represents in most of the steel plants a specialized job which requires a lot of preparation. A solidified salamander is normally difficult to remove especially if there is titanium in it. A large quantity of solid salamander can delay the critical path of the capital repairs of the blast furnace by a number of days or even by weeks. For the removal of the solidified salamander often requires oxygen lancing and even explosives. These types of removal also cause health and safety...

Blast Furnace Cast House and its Operation Jun06

Blast Furnace Cast House and its Operation...

Blast Furnace Cast House and its Operation  The blast furnace (BF) cast house is the working area where hot metal and liquid slag are tapped from the blast furnace and either poured into ladles (torpedo car or open top ladle) or led off for solidification (pig casting and slag granulation) or treatment (cast house desulphurization). A good trouble free cast house operation is an important requirement in a high productivity blast furnace for low cost operation. The cast house functional design, operational practice, refractory technology, automation and environmental requirements are important issues which are required to be looked into to meet the demands for greater reliability and output from the cast house. In any blast furnace cast house is the most labour intensive area in the entire BF operation. Its design must be fully integrated with the expected hot metal production, hearth volume, and tapping practice whilst minimizing use of labour, maintenance, materials and improving working environment. The prime objective is to remove the liquid iron from the blast furnace at a casting rate and through a number of casts per day that is determined by the smelting rate, effective hearth volume, and the desire to maintain the hearth in a ‘dry’ condition rather than by the availability of the cast house troughs, runners and cast house equipment. Typical lay out of a BF cast house is shown in Fig 1 Fig 1 Typical layout of a BF cast house  The design and operation of the cast house must improve the efficiency of BF operation with respect to the following parameters. Improvement in the working conditions for workmen engaged in tapping of the hot metal and liquid slag Reduction in the losses of heat from the hot metal by maintaining its temperature Reduction in...