Understanding Blast Furnace Ironmaking with Pulverized Coal Injection Nov04

Understanding Blast Furnace Ironmaking with Pulverized Coal Injection...

Understanding Blast Furnace Ironmaking with Pulverized Coal Injection Injection of pulverized coal in the blast furnace (BF) was initially driven by high oil prices but now the use of pulverized coal injection (PCI) has become a standard practice in the BF operation since it satisfies the requirement of reducing raw material costs, pollution and also satisfies the need to extend the life of ageing coke ovens. The injection of the pulverized coal into the BF results into (i) increase in the productivity of the BF, i.e. the amount of hot metal (HM) produced per day by the BF, (ii) reduce the consumption of the more expensive coking coals by replacing coke with cheaper soft coking or thermal coals, (iii) assist in maintaining furnace stability, (iv) improve the consistency of the quality of the HM and reduce its silicon (Si) content, and (v) reduce greenhouse gas emissions. In addition to these advantages, use of the PCI in the BF has proved to be a powerful tool in the hands of the furnace operator to adjust the thermal condition of the furnace much faster than what is possible by adjusting the burden charge from the top. Pulverized coal has basically two roles in the operation of a BF. It not only provides part of the heat required for reducing the iron ore, but also some of the reducing gases. For understanding the HM production in a BF with the injection of pulverized coal, it is necessary to understand what is happening inside the BF as well as the chemical reactions and the importance of permeability within the furnace and how the raw materials can affect this parameter. The BF is essentially a counter-current moving bed furnace with solids (iron ore, coke and flux), and later molten...