Waste Plastics injection in a Blast Furnace Nov14

Waste Plastics injection in a Blast Furnace...

Waste Plastics injection in a Blast Furnace The recycling of waste plastics (WP) by injecting them in a blast furnace (BF) is being practiced in few BFs especially in japan and Europe. The use of plastics in the BF also recovers energy from the WP and so it is sometimes considered as energy recovery. BF based ironmaking processes can utilize WP by any of the following methods. Carbonization with coal to produce coke. Top charging into the BF, although this generates unwanted tar from the decomposition of the plastics in the shaft. Gasifying the plastics outside the BF. The resultant synthesis gas is then injected through the tuyeres. Injection as a solid through the tuyeres in a similar way to pulverized coal (PC). Normally it is done as a co-injection of WP and coal into the BF. The first attempt for the waste plastics injection (WPI) in a BF was made at the Bremen Steel Works in 1994, with commercial injection starting a year later. The first integrated system for injecting plastic wastes was at NKK’s (now JFE Steel) Keihin Works in Japan. Injecting WP into BF has several environmental, operational and economic advantages. These include the following. Reduction in the amount of plastic wastes being landfilled or incinerated. Lower consumption of both coke and PC, thus saving coal resources. However, neither WP nor PC can completely replace coke. The amount of coke replaced in the BF is partly dependent on the quality of the WP. There is energy resource savings. The benefit of saved resources from mixed WPI is around 11 giga calories per ton (Gcal/t). There is decrease in the carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions since the combustion energy of WP is generally at least as high as that of PC normally injected,...

Understanding Blast Furnace Ironmaking with Pulverized Coal Injection Nov04

Understanding Blast Furnace Ironmaking with Pulverized Coal Injection...

Understanding Blast Furnace Ironmaking with Pulverized Coal Injection Injection of pulverized coal in the blast furnace (BF) was initially driven by high oil prices but now the use of pulverized coal injection (PCI) has become a standard practice in the BF operation since it satisfies the requirement of reducing raw material costs, pollution and also satisfies the need to extend the life of ageing coke ovens. The injection of the pulverized coal into the BF results into (i) increase in the productivity of the BF, i.e. the amount of hot metal (HM) produced per day by the BF, (ii) reduce the consumption of the more expensive coking coals by replacing coke with cheaper soft coking or thermal coals, (iii) assist in maintaining furnace stability, (iv) improve the consistency of the quality of the HM and reduce its silicon (Si) content, and (v) reduce greenhouse gas emissions. In addition to these advantages, use of the PCI in the BF has proved to be a powerful tool in the hands of the furnace operator to adjust the thermal condition of the furnace much faster than what is possible by adjusting the burden charge from the top. Pulverized coal has basically two roles in the operation of a BF. It not only provides part of the heat required for reducing the iron ore, but also some of the reducing gases. For understanding the HM production in a BF with the injection of pulverized coal, it is necessary to understand what is happening inside the BF as well as the chemical reactions and the importance of permeability within the furnace and how the raw materials can affect this parameter. The BF is essentially a counter-current moving bed furnace with solids (iron ore, coke and flux), and later molten...

Understanding Pulverized Coal Injection in Blast Furnace Oct21

Understanding Pulverized Coal Injection in Blast Furnace...

Understanding Pulverized Coal Injection in Blast Furnace Pulverized coal injection (PCI) is a well-established technology for hot metal (HM) production in a blast furnace (BF). It is practiced in most of the BFs and all the new BFs are normally built with PCI capability. The composition and properties of the coal used for injection can influence the operation, stability and productivity of the BF, the quality of the HM, and the composition of the BF gas. The coals being used for the PCI are described in the article under link ‘http://ispatguru.com/coal-for-pulverized-coal-injection-in-blast-furnace/’. The critical aspects of PCI systems include coal preparation, its storage and distribution to ensure uniform feed of coal to each tuyere without fluctuations in the coal delivery rate and its combustion through lance design and oxygen (O2) injection. Coal preparation Pulverization of coal is carried out in a single or multiple grinding mills (pulverizers) depending on the requirements. Grinding and distribution of the coal to the injection lances constitute a major operating cost. Coal reclaimed from coal storage is screened for the removal of the foreign material and any large lump of coal is crushed. The coal is then fed into the mill where it is pulverized and dried. Coal of the required size is transported out of the mill by the hot gas stream, collected in a bag filter and conveyed to the storage bins. Grinding and transport are carried out under an inert atmosphere to minimize the risk of ignition of the dry coal particles. The resultant particle size distribution of the pulverized coal affects it handleability in pneumatic transport equipment and, at high injection rates, its combustibility. Pulverizers grind coal to one of the two size fractions namely (i) pulverized coal where around 70 % to 80 % of...

Tecnored Process for Ironmaking Apr30

Tecnored Process for Ironmaking...

Tecnored Process for Ironmaking Tecnored process was developed by ‘Tecnored Desenvolvimento Tecnológico S.A.’ of Brazil and is based upon a low pressure moving bed reduction furnace which reduces cold bonded, carbon bearing, self-fluxing, and self-reducing pellets. Reduction is carried out in a short height shaft furnace of distinct design at typical reduction temperatures. The process produces hot metal (liquid iron). Tecnored technology has been conceived and developed to be a ‘coke-less’ ironmaking process, thus avoiding the investment and operation of environmentally harmful  coke ovens besides significantly reducing green-house gas emissions in the production of hot metal. Tecnored process uses a combination of hot and cold blast and requires no additional oxygen. It eliminates the need for coke plants, sinter plants, and tonnage oxygen plants. Hence, the process has much lower operating and investment costs than those of traditional ironmaking routes. Tecnored process is flexible with regard to the type of iron bearing and carbon bearing raw materials which it can process. The ability of the process to smelt either pellets or briquettes, or even mixed charges of both, provides means of using a wide range of alternative feed materials. The process has got good productivity and high energy efficiency. Tecnored process is also being claimed to be suitable for producing ferro alloys such as ferro manganese. History of development The history of the development of the Tecnored process comprises different phases with different goals, testing a wide range of raw materials and using distinct sizes and concepts of the reactor. During the period 1979 to 1985, development activities were carried out regarding the use of pyrite cinder containing self-reducing pellets as metallic burden in cupola furnaces. This concept of self-reduction was adapted to develop the new process.  In 1985 the concept of the Tecnored...

Technologies for Improving Blast Furnace Operating Performance Oct03

Technologies for Improving Blast Furnace Operating Performance...

Technologies for Improving Blast Furnace Operating Performance A blast furnace (BF) is an investment in the future. Hence it is necessary that there is the proper dimensioning of all equipment, systems and components as well as incorporation of technologies which assure the desired production and quality so that improved performance of the blast furnace can be achieved. This is particularly true when blast furnace goes for capital repairs. During capital repairs incorporation of technologies for the improvement of blast furnace operating performance also meet the new demands placed on the performance of the blast furnace, personnel safety, lower maintenance requirements and environmental compliance. A key challenge for blast furnace operators has always been to assure a continuous and reliable supply of hot metal for the steel melting shop at uniform quality and at the lowest possible costs. Any interruption in the production of hot metal can lead to potential standstills in the downstream production and processing facilities. Downtime must be kept to a minimum while the blast furnace campaign life must be extended for as long as possible. Fluctuations in blast furnace operating parameters must be avoided for uniform hot metal quality, which is only possible through the application of proper technologies as well as sophisticated automation and process control solutions. There are several technologies (Fig 1), which when adopted greatly improve blast furnace operating performance and increase its efficiency both with respect to productivity and fuel consumption. This results into improved hot metal production rate per unit of volume of blast furnace and reduced consumption of BF coke. Some of the major technologies are described below. Fig 1 Technologies for improving BF operating performance Increase in furnace internal volume By using advanced technologies for furnace refractory lining and furnace cooling, it is possible...