Iron and Types of Iron...

Iron and Types of Iron Iron is a chemical element with symbol Fe (from Latin word Ferrum). Its atomic number is 26 and atomic mass is 55.85. It has a melting point of 1538 deg C and boiling point of 2862 deg C. The density of iron is 7.87 grams/cu cm. It is a metal in the first transition series. Like the elements of other group 8 elements (ruthenium and osmium), iron exists in a wide range of oxidation states, ?2 to +6, although +2 and +3 are the most common. Iron as a common metal is mostly confused with other metals such as different types of steels. Iron is by mass the most common element on the earth, forming much of earth’s outer and inner core. It is the fourth most common element and the second most common metal in the earth crust. Steels contain over 95 % Fe. Elemental iron occurs in meteoroids and other low oxygen environments, but is reactive to oxygen and water. Fresh iron surfaces appear lustrous silvery-gray, but oxidize in normal air to give hydrated iron oxides, commonly known as rust. Unlike the metals which form passivating oxide layers, iron oxides occupy more volume than the metal and thus flake off, exposing fresh surfaces for corrosion. Iron objects have been found in Egypt dating from around 3500 BCE (Before Common Era). They contain around 7.5 % nickel, which indicates that they were of meteoric origin. The ancient Hittites of Asia Minor (today’s Turkey) were the first to smelt iron from its ores around 1500 BCE. The ‘Iron Age’ had begun at that time. The first person to explain the various types of iron was René Antoine Ferchault de Réaumur who wrote a book on the subject in 1722. This explained how steel, wrought iron, and cast iron, were to be distinguished by the amount of charcoal (carbon) they contained. The...

Handling of Hot Metal in Blast Furnace Iron Making Feb10

Handling of Hot Metal in Blast Furnace Iron Making...

Handling of Hot Metal in Blast Furnace Iron Making  Hot metal (HM) is produced by the reduction of descending ore burden by the ascending reducing gases in a blast furnace (BF). It is liquid in nature and gets collected in the hearth of the BF. From the hearth, the HM is tapped from the taphole of the BF after an interval of time. Normally in large BFs, HM tapping rates of 7 ton/min and liquid tapping velocities of 5 m/sec, in tap holes of 70 mm diameter and 3.5 m long, are typically encountered. The tapping rate of HM is strongly influenced by the taphole condition and taphole length. Generally the temperature of tapped HM varies in the range of 1420 deg C to 1480 deg C. The tapped HM is handled in the following three stages. Handling of the HM in the cast house i.e. from taphole to the hot metal ladles HM ladles and their transport Processing of HM either in the pig casting machine (PCM) for the production of pig iron (PI) or in the steel melting shop for making steel. Historical development of hot metal handling During the seventeenth century, the produced liquid iron (usually around 450 kg per cast) from the iron making furnace was drawn into a single trench or ladled into sand moulds to produce domestic products such as pots, pans, stove plates etc.  As the BF production increased due to many design improvements, removal of liquid products (iron and slag) became an issue. Production of charcoal BF had increased over the period from one ton to 25 tons per day. This higher tonnage could not be handled with two casts per day through a single trench in front of the tap hole. The cast house contained...

Evolution of Blast Furnace Iron Making Jan10

Evolution of Blast Furnace Iron Making...

Evolution of Blast Furnace Iron Making The origin of the first smelting of iron is concealed in the unrecorded history of human civilization. The first evidence of iron implements being used in ancient times actually comes from Egypt where an iron tool was found in a joint between two stones in a pyramid. The origin of many prehistoric iron implements was probably meteoric iron. Meteoric iron contains 5 % to 26 % nickel (Ni) while smelted iron contains only traces of Ni and hence iron artifacts made from meteors can be differentiated from objects of smelted iron. More than 4,000 years ago, people discovered meteoric iron. But it was another 2,000 years before the production of iron from mined iron ore began. The earliest finds of smelted iron in India date back to 1800 BCE (Before Common Era).  The smelting of iron is said to have taken place among the Calybes of Armenia, subjects of the Hittite Empire, at about 1500 BCE. When their empire collapsed around 1200 BCE, the various tribes took the knowledge of iron making with them, spreading it across Europe and Asia. The knowledge of ironworking in all of Europe and Western Asia is ultimately traced to this source. The Iron Age began with the discovery of smelting of iron. Beginning of iron smelting As with the reduction of cop­per sulfide ores, the first reduction of iron oxide was probably accidental. It was the powers of observation that led these ancient metallurgists (who were the miners, chemists, and technologists of their day) to realize that iron could be produced in simple furnaces by direct carbon (C) reduction of the oxide ore. The first recorded depiction of a smelting process was found on the wall of an Egyptian tomb dating to...

Materials needed for Steel Production in Basic Oxygen Furnace Oct16

Materials needed for Steel Production in Basic Oxygen Furnace...

Materials needed for Steel Production in Basic Oxygen Furnace The following types of materials are needed for the production of liquid steel in the basic oxygen furnace (BOF) steelmaking process (Fig 1). Basic raw materials such as hot metal, scrap, and lime etc. Secondary raw materials such as deoxidizers and carburizers. Utility gases such as oxygen, nitrogen, and argon etc. Refractories and Refractory materials such as lining material, gunning material and patching materials etc. Consumable probes such as temperature probes and sampling probes etc. Cooling water for cooling of oxygen blowing lance and exhaust gases. Fig 1 Materials needed for the production of steel in basic oxygen furnace Basic raw Materials The basic raw materials needed for making steel in the BOF converter include (i) hot metal from the blast furnace, (ii) steel scrap and/or any other metallic iron source, (iii) iron ore, and (iv) fluxes.  Scrap, charged from a scrap box, is the first material to be charged into the BOF. The hot metal is then poured into the converter from a hot metal charging ladle, after which the blowing with oxygen gas is started. The fluxes, usually in lump form, are charged into the BOF through a bin system after the start of the oxygen blow. The fluxes can also be injected into the furnace in powder form through bottom tuyeres. The composition and amounts of basic raw materials used in the BOF converter vary from one steel melting shop to another, depending on their availability and the economics of the process. The hot metal or liquid iron is the primary source of iron units and energy. Hot metal is received from the blast furnaces in either open top or torpedo cars. In case of open top ladles, hot metal is poured...

Granulation of Liquid Iron Oct15

Granulation of Liquid Iron...

Granulation of Liquid Iron Granulation of liquid iron is a method of handling of excess production of hot metal in a blast furnace (BF)  which cannot be consumed by steel making in the steel melting shop of an integrated iron and steel plant. It is a cost effective method of producing a solid product which is known as granulated iron (GI). GI has good chemical and physical properties like pig iron and can be used as a prime raw material for the purpose of steel making. GI has a chemical composition identical to the liquid iron which is being granulated. There is no oxidation or slag entrapment in the GI and there is high metallic content. Fig 1 shows some pieces of GI. Fig 1 Granulated iron  A GI plant takes care of any mismatch between the production at the iron making facilities and the requirement of liquid iron at the steel making facilities. It is logistically positioned in between the two facilities. Excess liquid iron from the BF is diverted to the GI plant for the production of GI. This eliminates reduction of hot blast volume at the BF while producing GI which can be used as internal feedstock as coolant in the BOF, or for external sales to be used by the cupolas, induction furnaces (IF) and electric arc furnaces (EAF). GI plants can be constructed and operated with capacities matching with the BF outputs. They are alternative to the pig casting machines (PCM) but with considerable higher capacities. The capacities of even twin strand PCMs are limited due to the solidification time of the liquid iron in the pig moulds. The PCMs also requires frequent mechanical maintenance as a consequence of the complex design. The GI has identical properties to that...