Combustion System of a Reheating Furnace Jul01

Combustion System of a Reheating Furnace...

Combustion System of a Reheating Furnace The main function of a reheating furnace is to raise the temperature of the semi-finished steels (billets, blooms, slabs or rounds) typically to temperatures between 1000 deg C and 1250 deg C, until it is plastic enough to be rolled to the desired section, size or shape in the hot rolling mill. The reheating furnace must also meet specific requirements and objectives in terms of the heating rates for metallurgical and productivity reasons. In the reheating furnace there is a continuous flow of material which is heated to the desired temperature as it travels through the furnace. Hot rolling operations require high quality reheated semi-finished steels at the lowest possible cost and at the optimal production rate of the rolling mill. The reheating furnaces used for heating the semi-finished steels in a hot rolling mill consume a large quantity of the energy and simultaneously generate large quantity of pollutants. Because of this, there is a necessity to look into the ways for the reduction of energy consumption as well as pollutants and hence the costs. This can be done by improving the fuel efficiency of the reheating furnaces. The combustion system of the reheating furnace has a major influence on both the quality of the reheated semi-finished steel product and on the amount of fuel needed for the reheating. The important expectations from a reheating furnace today are not only to lower the emission of the pollutants and the energy consumption, but also to have the improved high quality of the heated steel product, reliability, uniform temperature, heat flux and safety of the equipment and personnel. All these are the key factors which have considerable effect on the combustion system of the reheating furnace. The three basic things...

Understanding Electric Arc Furnace Steel Making Operations Feb18

Understanding Electric Arc Furnace Steel Making Operations...

Understanding Electric Arc Furnace Steel Making Operations  Electric arc furnace (EAF) steel making technology is more than hundred years old. Though De Laval had patented an electric furnace for the melting and refining of iron in 1892 and Heroult had demonstrated electric arc melting of ferro alloys between 1888 and 1892, the first industrial EAF  for steel making only came into operation in 1900. Development was rapid and there was a tenfold increase in production from 1910 to 1920, with over 500,000 tons being produced in 1920, though this represented still only a very small percentage of the global production of steel  of that time. Initially, EAF steelmaking was developed for producing special grades of steels using solid forms of feed such as scrap and ferro alloys. Solid material were firstly melted through direct arc melting, refined through the addition of the appropriate fluxes and tapped for further processing. Fig 1 shows a typical plan and section view of an EAF Fig 1 Typical plan and section view of an EAF  Electric arc furnaces range in capacity from a few tons to as many as 400 tons, and a steel melting shop can have a single furnace or up to three or four. In brief, these furnaces melt steel by applying an AC current to a steel scrap charge by mean of graphite electrodes. It requires a tremendous quantity of electricity. The melting process involves the use of large quantities of energy in a short time and in some instances the process has caused disturbances in power grids. These disturbances have usually been characterized as ‘flicker’ (brief irregularities in voltage a fraction of the 50 -60 Hz cycle in length), and ‘harmonics’ (irregularities that tend to occur in a pattern repetitive to the 50-60 Hz...

Oxy- Fuel Combustion and its Application in Reheating Furnace Jan13

Oxy- Fuel Combustion and its Application in Reheating Furnace...

Oxy- Fuel Combustion and its Application in Reheating Furnace Steel reheating is an energy intensive process requiring uniform temperature distribution within reheating furnaces. Historically, recuperators have been used to preheat combustion air, thereby conserving energy. More recent innovations include oxygen (O2) enrichment and the use of regenerative burners, which provide higher preheat air temperatures than recuperators. These processes have limitations such as equipment deterioration, decreasing energy efficiency over time, high maintenance costs, and increased NOx emissions with increased air preheat temperature, unless special equipment is used. Three things are necessary for the starting and sustenance of combustion. These are fuel, oxygen and sufficient energy for ignition. The efficiency of the combustion process is highest if fuel and oxygen can meet and react without any restrictions. But during heating practice, besides efficient combustion, transfer of heat is also of practical considerations. Normal air used for combustion contains nitrogen (N2) and argon (Ar) besides oxygen. In an air – fuel burner the burner flame contains nitrogen from the combustion air. A significant amount of the fuel energy is used to heat up this nitrogen. The hot nitrogen leaves through the stack, creating energy losses. Hence air does not provide optimum conditions for combustion as well as heat transfer. Heat absorbed by nitrogen either gets wasted or is to be recovered for the purpose of energy conservation. Present day best air- fuel heating system in the reheating furnace need at least 310 M Cal for a ton of steel for achieving the right temperature of the steel product for rolling. Historically, the primary use of oxy-fuel combustion has been in welding and cutting of metals, especially steel, since oxy-fuel allows for higher flame temperatures than can be achieved with an air-fuel flame. Introduction of an innovative oxy...

Types of Burners in Reheating Furnaces Jan08

Types of Burners in Reheating Furnaces...

Types of Burners in Reheating Furnaces Presently steel industry is facing major challenges of the continuous reduction of the  environmental emissions while improving the economic viability of the processes. Reheating furnaces due to their high-energy consumption is one area where attention of steel industry is needed. They are important equipment which contribute to the productivity and energy efficiency of the steel plant. Modern reheating furnaces are walking beam furnaces where the beams lift the charge steel material (billets, blooms or slabs) inside the furnace and move it to the next position. The heating is done in these furnaces by direct firing of the fuel both from above and below of the steel charge material, using roof burners (to heat the roof which then radiates the heat to the steel charge material) and/or long flame burners (side walls or/and front wall). Common fuels used in the reheating furnaces are mixed gas of low calorific value (blast furnace gas mixed with the coke oven gas and the converter gas), coke oven gas, heavy oil, low sulphur heavy stock (LSHS), or natural gas. The important  parameters for a reheating furnace includes  the combustion system consisting of the fuel used, supply and the technological condition of the combustion air, the burners and their location for proper heat distribution, preheating of combustion air and fuel gas, waste heat recovery system, air fuel ratio, control of furnace draft, the furnace exhaust system, and furnace parameters measurement and control system.  The furnace combustion system besides supporting the required productivity level of the furnace, ensures efficient utilization of heat input, lower heat losses, efficient recovery of waste heat, minimal damage to the furnace refractories, and lower generation of green house gases specially NOx. The furnace combustion system also ensures a furnace atmosphere...