Learning Culture and Organizational Performance...

Learning Culture and Organizational Performance With the current expansion in the global economy and the fast-changing evolution of technology and innovation, organizations are facing an ongoing need for employees’ learning and development. As knowledge becomes increasingly a key factor for productivity, it has also become a currency for the competitive success. The learning culture in the organization contributes to the organizational learning and the transfer of knowledge to the workplace.  Hence, the learning culture has a very important role to play in the performance of the organization. A learning culture moves beyond compliance by encouraging the employees to develop self-correcting mechanisms and internal practices which use knowledge to examine failures and weaknesses to make programmatic and operational changes. Further, a learning culture minimizes barriers to learning and knowledge and rewards and encourages knowledge driven practices, making learning and continuous improvement the rule, not the exception. Fig 1 provides the transition from a compliance culture to learning culture in the organization. Fig 1 Transition from a compliance culture to learning culture in the organization Creating a learning culture within the organisation makes the employees to take one step beyond just acquiring the skills which they need to deliver the products and services. Learning culture empowers the employees to achieve dramatically improved results compared to the organization having no positive learning culture. The learning culture in the organization enhances the ability of the organization to learn, and translate that learning into action rapidly and thus provides the organization the ultimate competitive advantage. It enables the employees to (i) easily adapt to change, (ii) actually anticipate the change, (iii) be more responsive to the market requirements, and (iv) grow through innovation. It also generates more energetic, loyal and goal oriented employees. A learning culture makes an organization...

Importance of Communication in the Organization...

Importance of Communication in the Organization Communication has been derived from the Latin word ‘communis’, meaning to share. It is considered to be the exchange of an information, thought and emotion between individuals of groups. It plays a fundamental role in balancing the objectives of the employees and the organization. It consists of the activity of conveying information. Hence, it requires a sender, a message, and an intended recipient, although the receiver need not be present or aware of the sender’s intent to communicate at the time of communication. Hence, communication can occur across vast distances in time and space. Communication requires that the communicating parties share an area of communicative commonality. The process of communication (Fig 1) is complete once the receiver has understood the message of the sender. Feedback is critical for effective communication between the sender and the receiver of the message. Organizational communication is one of the important segments of the communication. Fig 1 Process of communication The two most common definitions of communication are (i) communication is sending and receiving of messages by means of symbols and in that context organizational communication is a key element of organizational climate, and (ii) communication is transfer of information from sender to receiver under the condition that the receiver understands the message. Communication is a process which is transactional (i.e., it involves two or more persons interacting within an environment) and symbolic (i.e., communication transactions ‘stand for’ other things, at various levels of abstraction). An organization involves a social collectivity (or a group of persons) in which activities are coordinated in order to achieve both individual and collective goals. By coordinating activities, some degree of organizational structure is created to assist employees in dealing with each other and with others in the...

Management by Trust in an Organization...

Management by Trust in an Organization Trust is considered as an important component for the effective organizational performance since it ensures cooperation between two entities. In fact, trust is important in all spheres of social life. It binds friendships, facilitates bargaining and negotiations, reduces transaction costs in inter organizational exchanges, and even resolves conflicts. Trust also affects investment decisions. It is a fundamental component in any positive, productive, and social process. In an organization management trust significantly and positively contributes to organizational trust and organizational trust significantly and positively contributes to organizational performance (Fig 1). Fig 1 Relationship between trust and organizational performance For an organization, trust is also important for the positive outcome of the cooperative behaviour of the employees, the organizational commitment, and employee loyalty. In fact, the management’s prime and challenging objective in an organization is to be to build employees’ trust in the organization. There are two types of trust, one of which is exchange-based or relational in nature and the other character-based or cognitive in nature. Further, three factors can be identified which make it difficult to build trust. The first factor is that the trust building is an interactive process which involves (at least) two individuals learning about each other’s trustworthiness. The second factor is that the underlying systems dynamics of both trust and distrust are based on positive feedbacks, reinforcing the initial behaviour but with an important asymmetry. While the trust is built up gradually and incrementally, reinforced by previous trusting behaviour and previous positive experiences, the distrust is disastrous and instantaneous. The third factor is that there is no absolute certainty that the trust is going to be honoured. However, there is no satisfactory explanation available to account for these factors in the process of trust-building...

Qualities of Chief Executive Officer for Organizational Success...

Qualities of Chief Executive Officer for Organizational Success A chief executive officer (CEO) of an organization requires a large number of qualities besides hard work and dedication for the success of the organization which he is heading. The performance of the organization is dependent on the capabilities of the CEO. The job carries with it a large amount of responsibilities. The job of CEO is not a bed of roses. In fact, it is a very tough job and is fundamentally different from any other job in a senior management position. The CEO needs to have the self-discipline to get results. He needs to be charismatic. He is required to have high cognitive ability, conscientiousness/achievement, and extraversion/assertiveness. He needs to have innovative strategies. He is required to forge long-term relationships with customers, innovate, execute, build high-performing teams, ensure accountability, manage people, communicate, engage others, create workforce plans, exercise judgment, have emotional intelligence, and possess an honorable character The CEO needs to have leadership qualities. His integrity is to be unquestionable. He is to be impartial. He is to be modest and endure greatness besides being efficient and flexible. He is to be aggressive but respectful. He is to move fast to fulfill the commitments. He is to be calm under pressure. He is required to treat people with respect. He is to set the example and high standards for others to follow. A CEO is to have a lot of enthusiasm and persistence. He is to be innovative and proactive. He is required to have analytical skills and creative thinking. He needs to have vision and strategic plans. He is to be diligent and systematic.  At the same time he is to pay attention to details. A CEO is to have the habit of...

Management of Organizational Growth...

Management of Organizational Growth Organizational growth is not automatic. It does not follow from success. Of course, it needs organization to have the right products or services for the right markets at the right time. But this is a requirement for growth, a necessary condition, rather than growth itself. Growth of an organization is full of stress and strain. It causes discontinuity. It makes the organization to change itself. It can create identity crisis as there is transition from old stage to new stage. Even the ablest, the brightest, the most highly motivated organization can suffer the worst identity crisis. For an organization to be able to grow smoothly and without trouble, it is to be carefully prepared for growth, trained for growth, and directed towards growth. The management can prepare the organization for growth by thinking big the way IBM has done it in the mid twentieth century. The IBM management adopted a impressive name,’ International Business Machines’, at a time when IBM was neither international nor truly business machines. IBM created an organizational image through distinctive design and distinctive typography for its products, its publications, and its communications inside and outside the organization. It invented the slogan ‘think’ and distributed hundreds of thousands of ‘think’ posters and stickers to its employees and customers. From very early days IBM had developed and trained a human organization which was to look upon itself as select force and which was prepared to manage a very much bigger organization. The management had insisted that the employees take responsibility for their own work and thus trained a whole cadre of proud and competent workforce which became the skeleton around which the much bigger IBM workforce of later years was built. Above all, the management trained, and trained,...