Continuous casting of steel billets Mar19

Continuous casting of steel billets...

Continuous casting of steel billets Continuous casting of steel is a process in which liquid steel is continuously solidified into a strand of metal. Depending on the dimensions of the strand, these semi-finished products are called slabs, blooms or billets. Steel billet has a square cross section with one side normally 150 mm or less. It is a feed material for rolling of steel in light section mills, bar mills, and wire rod mills. Steel billets are also used in forging of certain products. The process of continuous casting was invented in the 1950s in an attempt to increase the productivity of steel production. Previously only ingot casting was available which still has its benefits and advantages but does not always meet the productivity demands. Since then, continuous casting has been developed further to improve on yield, quality and cost efficiency. Continuous casting of steel is now the method of choice by all steel producers replacing the old method of ingot casting. Distinguished by its many advantages, this process has gone through many improvements and was and still is the subject of wide range of studies both empirically and mathematically. Continuous casting of steel billets is one of the type of continuous casting adopted in steel industry, by which, steel billets are produced continuously and simultaneously. This type of process requires great control of operating parameters in order to produce sound and continuous billets. The process can be divided into a number of steps starting by pouring the hot liquid steel from the steelmaking furnace into the ladle, where the steel chemistry is being adjusted in secondary steelmaking, then pouring into the distributor (tundish), and from the distributor into the casting mould. Solidification of steel begins in the copper casting mould by indirect cooling,...

Historical aspects of the Continuous Casting and related Technologies for Steel Mar06

Historical aspects of the Continuous Casting and related Technologies for Steel...

Historical aspects of the Continuous Casting and related Technologies for Steel Continuous casting (CC) technology of steel, as a method of solidification processing of liquid steel has a relatively short history —not much longer than oxygen steelmaking. Different to other processes in steel production, continuous casting is the vital link between the liquid and the solid phase and has to live with metallurgical effects as well as mechanical challenges at the same time. Continuous casting transforms liquid steel into solid on a continuous basis and includes a variety of important commercial processes. These processes are the most efficient way to solidify large volumes of liquid steel into simple shapes for subsequent processing. The CC ratio for the world steel industry is now around 96 % of crude steel output which was a mere 4 % in 1970. Continuous casting is distinguished from other solidification processes by its steady state nature. The liquid steel solidifies against the mould walls while it is simultaneously withdrawn from the bottom of the mould at a rate which maintains the solid / liquid interface at a constant position with time. The process works best when all of its aspects operate in this steady-state manner. Relative to other casting processes, continuous casting generally has a higher capital cost, but lower operating cost. It is the most cost- and energy- efficient method to mass-produce semi-finished steel products with consistent quality in a variety of sizes and shapes. Cross-sections can be rectangular, for subsequent rolling into plate or sheet, square or circular for long products and seamless pipes, and even dog-bone shapes, for rolling into I or H beams. Today continuous casting machines consist of modularized technological/mechatronic packages to allow fast design and short project execution time as well as rapid production ramp-up...