Slag splashing technique in converter operation Mar24

Slag splashing technique in converter operation...

                     Slag splashing technique in converter operation  The erosion of refractory lining of a converter has a major contribution for the low lining life. Erosion occurs because of chemical erosion due to attack of slag and molten metal on the refractory of the converter at the high operating temperatures and because of thermal shocks as well as due to mechanical wear.  Slag splashing technique has been developed to counter this erosion and produce a freeze lining. Today slag splashing has become a powerful tool not only for increasing of the lining life of the converter but for increasing of the converter availability and maximizing of production besides reducing of the refractory and gunning costs. History Slag splashing technique was first developed in 1970 but was not put to large scale use. The Indiana Harbour plant of LTV steel was first to report success in 1992 with respect to improvement in the lining life by the use of this technique. Slowly this technique was used in the other steel melting shops of the world. Inland no. 4 BOF shop has reported a lining life of plus 60,000 heats. The process The slag splashing steps are as follows At the end of the previous heat the liquid steel is tapped in steel teeming ladle and molten slag remains in the converter. The converter operator visually inspects the slag condition to determine the quantity of slag conditioner to be added. The converter operator visually inspects the converter lining to determine if any specific area of the lining needs special attention. The molten slag is conditioned with respect to its temperature, FeO and MgO contents by the addition of a conditioner in required quantity. The converter is rocked for slag coating of the charge pad and tapping pad....