Development of Smelting Reduction Processes for Ironmaking Mar08

Development of Smelting Reduction Processes for Ironmaking...

Development of Smelting Reduction Processes for Ironmaking Smelting reduction (SR) processes are the most recent development in the production technology of hot metal (liquid iron). These processes combine the gasification of non-coking coal with the melt reduction of iron ore. Energy intensity of SR processes is lower than that of blast furnace (BF), since the production of coke is not needed and the need for preparation of iron ore is also reduced. SR ironmaking process was conceived in the late 1930s. The history of the development of SR processes goes back to the 1950s. The laboratory scale fundamental studies on the SR of iron ore were started first by Dancy in 1951. However, serious efforts started from 1980 onwards. There have been two separate lines of development of primary ironmaking technology during the second half of twentieth century. The first line of development was centred on the BF which remained the principal process unit for the hot metal production. In general, this line of the development did not encompass any radical process changes in the furnace itself. It proceeded through a gradual evolution which involved (i) increase in the furnace size, (ii) improvement in the burden preparation, (iii) increase in the top pressure, (iv) increase of hot blast temperature, (v) bell-less charging and improvements in burden distribution, (vi) improvements in refractories and cooling systems, (vii) injection of auxiliary fuels (fuel gas, liquid fuel, or pulverized coal) and enrichment of hot air blast with oxygen (O2), and (viii) application of automation as well as improvements in instrumentation and control technology. The continued success of the ironmaking in BF reflects the very high levels of thermal and chemical efficiencies which can be achieved during the production of hot metal and the consequent cost advantages. In fact,...

Understanding Electric Arc Furnace Steel Making Operations Feb18

Understanding Electric Arc Furnace Steel Making Operations...

Understanding Electric Arc Furnace Steel Making Operations  Electric arc furnace (EAF) steel making technology is more than hundred years old. Though De Laval had patented an electric furnace for the melting and refining of iron in 1892 and Heroult had demonstrated electric arc melting of ferro alloys between 1888 and 1892, the first industrial EAF  for steel making only came into operation in 1900. Development was rapid and there was a tenfold increase in production from 1910 to 1920, with over 500,000 tons being produced in 1920, though this represented still only a very small percentage of the global production of steel  of that time. Initially, EAF steelmaking was developed for producing special grades of steels using solid forms of feed such as scrap and ferro alloys. Solid material were firstly melted through direct arc melting, refined through the addition of the appropriate fluxes and tapped for further processing. Fig 1 shows a typical plan and section view of an EAF Fig 1 Typical plan and section view of an EAF  Electric arc furnaces range in capacity from a few tons to as many as 400 tons, and a steel melting shop can have a single furnace or up to three or four. In brief, these furnaces melt steel by applying an AC current to a steel scrap charge by mean of graphite electrodes. It requires a tremendous quantity of electricity. The melting process involves the use of large quantities of energy in a short time and in some instances the process has caused disturbances in power grids. These disturbances have usually been characterized as ‘flicker’ (brief irregularities in voltage a fraction of the 50 -60 Hz cycle in length), and ‘harmonics’ (irregularities that tend to occur in a pattern repetitive to the 50-60 Hz...