Importance of Communication in the Organization...

Importance of Communication in the Organization Communication has been derived from the Latin word ‘communis’, meaning to share. It is considered to be the exchange of an information, thought and emotion between individuals of groups. It plays a fundamental role in balancing the objectives of the employees and the organization. It consists of the activity of conveying information. Hence, it requires a sender, a message, and an intended recipient, although the receiver need not be present or aware of the sender’s intent to communicate at the time of communication. Hence, communication can occur across vast distances in time and space. Communication requires that the communicating parties share an area of communicative commonality. The process of communication (Fig 1) is complete once the receiver has understood the message of the sender. Feedback is critical for effective communication between the sender and the receiver of the message. Organizational communication is one of the important segments of the communication. Fig 1 Process of communication The two most common definitions of communication are (i) communication is sending and receiving of messages by means of symbols and in that context organizational communication is a key element of organizational climate, and (ii) communication is transfer of information from sender to receiver under the condition that the receiver understands the message. Communication is a process which is transactional (i.e., it involves two or more persons interacting within an environment) and symbolic (i.e., communication transactions ‘stand for’ other things, at various levels of abstraction). An organization involves a social collectivity (or a group of persons) in which activities are coordinated in order to achieve both individual and collective goals. By coordinating activities, some degree of organizational structure is created to assist employees in dealing with each other and with others in the...

Management of Workplace Conflicts...

Management of Workplace Conflicts The differences of the employees of an organization define their uniqueness. These differences can be due to their backgrounds, culture, gender, beliefs, values, and behaviours. Different employees may have differences with their co-employees in the peer groups. They may have different abilities, talents, and levels of attractiveness or interest. These differences though help in the progress and contribute to the dynamics of the organization yet they also contribute to workplace conflicts in the organization. Each of the employees of the organization is likely to experience some degree of conflict, be it personal, professional, or organizational. Employees of the organization are human beings and the very essence of being human contributes directly to the varying degrees of unhappiness, distress and destruction. Every employee has his own unique background and his own needs defined by his values and beliefs. When these needs are not met, or are denied, then the employee is in the state of conflict. All the employees of the organization are different from each other. They have different needs, tastes, opinions, beliefs, preferences and values. There is a need to cope with these differences. The differences are not to be allowed to get in the way and be the source of workplace conflict. On the contrary the differences are to be exploited for the employees’ creativities. Workplace conflicts are of four types (Fig 1). They are (i) conflicts over facts and data, (ii) conflicts over process or methods, (iii) conflicts over purpose, and (iv) conflicts over values. Further, the workplace conflicts can be simple or complex. These are always the underlying causes for various conflicts at the workplace. Conflicts over facts and data – The two sides involved in the conflict have two sets of facts or two different...