Employees and organizational responsibility...

Employees and organizational responsibility Employees, whether unskilled or skilled, manual, clerical, or knowledge worker, are required to take the burden of responsibility. For this, they need tools, incentives, and security. Organizational management normally expects every employee to be responsible and has focus on his job. The job has to make achievement possible. Though the job is not everything, yet it comes first. If other aspects of working are not satisfactory, they can spoil even the most achieving job. But if the job itself is not achieving, nothing else can provide achievement. This may appear to be silly, but the major approaches to managing the employee, throughout history, have focused on elements external to the job. For instance, several trade union leaders, while focusing on ownership, have, by and large, left unchanged the structure of jobs and the traditional practices of managing employees. Protectiveness focuses on welfare, i.e., on things like housing and health care etc.. These are very important, but not substitutes for job achievement. More recent solutions such as the ‘co-determination’, which certain trade unions are pushing to put union representatives on the board of directors and into top management but do not concern themselves with the employees’ job itself. The fundamental reality for every employee is the eight hours or so he spends on the job. It is this job, through which the great majority of the employees have access to achievement, to fulfillment, and to the organizational success. To enable the employee to achieve, he must therefore first be able to take responsibility for his job. This basically needs (i) productive work, (ii) feedback information, and (iii) continuous learning (Fig 1). Fig 1 Basic needs of employees for taking responsibilities It is foolish to ask employees to take responsibility for their...

Competencies and development of competency framework for organization...

Competencies and development of competency framework for organization The greatest strength of an organization, and the key to its success, is the quality of its employees and their ability to thrive and fulfill their potential while delivering the output expected from them. The competency framework enables the organization to clarify expectations and to set standards for performance throughout the organization. It is a guide to help management and the employees to understand the behaviours and skills expected of them and what they are to strive for achieving them. The concept of competencies emerged during the early 1980s as a response to the organizational changes. This concept drives the organization towards higher performance levels. During the subsequent decades, competency frameworks have become an increasingly accepted part of modern HR (human resource) practice in the organizations. Competencies A competency is considered to be a cluster of related knowledge, skills, abilities, and characteristics which are related to the performance of a significant aspect of the practice of a profession. The term ‘competency’ is usually defined as a combination of skills, attributes and behaviours which are directly related to the performance on the job. They are important for all the employees regardless of occupation, function, or level. Competencies normally focus on the personal attributes or inputs of employees in the organization. They are the behaviours (and technical attributes where appropriate) which employees are to have, or are to acquire, for their effective performance at work. Competencies are broader concepts which encompass demonstrable performance outputs as well as behaviour inputs, and relate to a system or set of minimum standards required for the performance at the work. Competencies are means to provide organizational focus, as building blocks for human resource systems, and as methods for certifying attainment of various...

Importance of leadership for Organizational Excellence...

Importance of leadership for Organizational Excellence  The classic model of the good organizational leader is the top executive in the organizational management who directs and who is in control of all aspects of the operations of the organization. This top executive leader operates through a hierarchy of management and the organization had a fairly well defined structure. This type of leadership has some good points and  it survived throughout most of the 20th century. The organization of today does not have the luxury of stability since it faces an ever increasing change in markets, customers and technology. It needs to accept, adopt and implement changes in the business model according to changing trends, technologies, customer preferences and future concerns. Further, the core business of the organization is constantly under threat today from the newcomers to the marketplace who are having a different business paradigm. Hence the organization cannot afford to depend upon the leadership of individual or/and a small team of senior executives to meet this challenge. The organization needs to harness the ideas, skills, energy, and enthusiasm of the entire team for success. For meeting of new challenges, this new concept and practice of leadership has evolved, where line managers have taken over the leadership role along with the top executive and his small team of senior executives. Leadership is an important factor for making an organization successful. It is the art or process of influencing people to perform assigned tasks willingly, efficiently and competently. Without leadership a line manager simply cannot be effective. Leadership of the line managers transforms potential into reality. When good leadership is in place in the organization, it can be felt throughout the entire organization. With good leadership, organizational culture is not forced but developed. Communication is effective...

Leading with Vision, Inspiration and Integrity for Excellence...

Leading with Vision, Inspiration and Integrity for Excellence An organization which aspires for excellence has leaders  in the management team who not only shape the future but also make it happen by acting as role models for its values and ethics. The leaders have capabilities  and integrity to inspire, adapt, react and gain the commitment of all the stakeholders. They are flexible, enabling the organization to anticipate and react in a timely manner to ensure and sustain the ongoing success of the organization. Organizational leaders develop the mission, vision, values and ethics and act as role models. They define, monitor, review and drive the improvement of the organizational management system and performance. They  engage with external stakeholders and reinforce a culture of excellence with the organizational people. They ensure that the organisation is flexible and manages change effectively. People like working with organizational leaders who do two things namely (i) lead from their values, and (ii) share an inspiring vision for the future. These two things are clearly connected. If the organizational leaders are grounded in their values, they can build a culture of trust and transparency in the organization. The three basic requirements for the organizational leaders for propelling the organization on the path of excellence are namely (i) vision, (ii) inspiration and (iii) integrity. These three basic requirements are shown in Fig 1 and described below. Fig 1 Basic requirements for organizational leadership Vision  Organizational leaders are to dream, create and articulate a wonderful, compelling and inspiring vision for the future of the organization. The vision is to reflect a new dawn for the organization and is to be created  working with imagination, insight, and boldness. It must present a challenge that calls forth the best in people and brings them together around a...

Organizational Agility for Excellence...

Organizational Agility for Excellence Organizational agility is the ability of the organization to manage continuous, rapid and sustainable change. It is the capacity and flexibility of the organization to be consistently adaptable to market and environmental changes with rapidness and speed. It is the efficiency with which the organization can respond to nonstop change. It is the organizational ability to exploit both revenue enhancing and cost cutting opportunities within its core business more quickly, effectively, and consistently than its  competitors. It makes the organization to operate at the speed with which the opportunities are getting created. In the fast changing complex environment of the present day organizational agility is  the key differentiator between organizations. Organizational agility is achieved by enhancing the organizational capabilities to identify and respond quickly in an effective and efficient manner to the opportunities and threats. Agility makes the organizational processes flexible and the response time of the organization to the critical issues reduces to a great extent. Agile organization is quickly able to take advantage of the opportunities and protect itself against the threat. It believes in putting in place systems to gather and share the information required to spot opportunities and by building processes to translate organizational priorities into focused action. Agile organization manage the challenge of change effectively and efficiently without falling prey to either chaos and inertia. Implementing organizational agility requires management to regard all areas of the organizational operations as potentially subject to change. It must recognise that changes come from the external world of customer demands, competitor influences, technological advances, regulatory changes, macro-economic shifts, change in political thinking and so on, and not simply as an internal activity. Management must also be able to use available resources in a timely, flexible, affordable and relevant manner,...