Blowing of Oxygen in Converter Steelmaking Sep14

Blowing of Oxygen in Converter Steelmaking...

 Blowing of Oxygen in Converter Steelmaking Oxygen (O2) is blown on the hot metal in the converter during steel making for removal of impurities such as carbon (C), silicon (Si), manganese (Mn), and phosphorus (P) etc.  A water cooled lance is used to inject oxygen at very high velocities onto a liquid bath to produce steel. In the 1950s when the top blown converter process was commercialized and the size of the converter was limited to 50 tons maximum then a lance with a single hole lance tip was being used for the blowing of O2 in the converter. With the passage of time the converter size went on increasing. This has necessitated increase of number of holes in the lance tip for better distribution of O2 over a larger surface of the bath in the converter. With the increasing demands to produce higher quality steels with lower impurity levels, O2 of very high purity is required for steelmaking in the converter. The O2 needed for steelmaking is to be at least 99.5 % pure, and ideally 99.7 % to 99.8 % pure. The remaining parts are 0.005 % to 0.01 % nitrogen (N2) and the rest is argon (Ar). In top-blown converters, the O2 is jetted at supersonic velocities with convergent divergent nozzles at the tip of the water cooled lance. A forceful gas jet penetrates the slag and impinges onto the surface of the liquid bath to refine the steel. Today most of the converters operate with lance tips containing 3 to 6 nozzles. Even 8 nozzles lance tips are under use. The axes of each of the nozzles in a lance with a multi hole lance tip are inclined with respect to the lance axes and equally spaced around the tip....