Continuous casting of steel billets Mar19

Continuous casting of steel billets...

Continuous casting of steel billets Continuous casting of steel is a process in which liquid steel is continuously solidified into a strand of metal. Depending on the dimensions of the strand, these semi-finished products are called slabs, blooms or billets. Steel billet has a square cross section with one side normally 150 mm or less. It is a feed material for rolling of steel in light section mills, bar mills, and wire rod mills. Steel billets are also used in forging of certain products. The process of continuous casting was invented in the 1950s in an attempt to increase the productivity of steel production. Previously only ingot casting was available which still has its benefits and advantages but does not always meet the productivity demands. Since then, continuous casting has been developed further to improve on yield, quality and cost efficiency. Continuous casting of steel is now the method of choice by all steel producers replacing the old method of ingot casting. Distinguished by its many advantages, this process has gone through many improvements and was and still is the subject of wide range of studies both empirically and mathematically. Continuous casting of steel billets is one of the type of continuous casting adopted in steel industry, by which, steel billets are produced continuously and simultaneously. This type of process requires great control of operating parameters in order to produce sound and continuous billets. The process can be divided into a number of steps starting by pouring the hot liquid steel from the steelmaking furnace into the ladle, where the steel chemistry is being adjusted in secondary steelmaking, then pouring into the distributor (tundish), and from the distributor into the casting mould. Solidification of steel begins in the copper casting mould by indirect cooling,...

Historical aspects of the Continuous Casting and related Technologies for Steel Mar06

Historical aspects of the Continuous Casting and related Technologies for Steel...

Historical aspects of the Continuous Casting and related Technologies for Steel Continuous casting (CC) technology of steel, as a method of solidification processing of liquid steel has a relatively short history —not much longer than oxygen steelmaking. Different to other processes in steel production, continuous casting is the vital link between the liquid and the solid phase and has to live with metallurgical effects as well as mechanical challenges at the same time. Continuous casting transforms liquid steel into solid on a continuous basis and includes a variety of important commercial processes. These processes are the most efficient way to solidify large volumes of liquid steel into simple shapes for subsequent processing. The CC ratio for the world steel industry is now around 96 % of crude steel output which was a mere 4 % in 1970. Continuous casting is distinguished from other solidification processes by its steady state nature. The liquid steel solidifies against the mould walls while it is simultaneously withdrawn from the bottom of the mould at a rate which maintains the solid / liquid interface at a constant position with time. The process works best when all of its aspects operate in this steady-state manner. Relative to other casting processes, continuous casting generally has a higher capital cost, but lower operating cost. It is the most cost- and energy- efficient method to mass-produce semi-finished steel products with consistent quality in a variety of sizes and shapes. Cross-sections can be rectangular, for subsequent rolling into plate or sheet, square or circular for long products and seamless pipes, and even dog-bone shapes, for rolling into I or H beams. Today continuous casting machines consist of modularized technological/mechatronic packages to allow fast design and short project execution time as well as rapid production ramp-up...

Handling of Hot Metal in Blast Furnace Iron Making Feb10

Handling of Hot Metal in Blast Furnace Iron Making...

Handling of Hot Metal in Blast Furnace Iron Making  Hot metal (HM) is produced by the reduction of descending ore burden by the ascending reducing gases in a blast furnace (BF). It is liquid in nature and gets collected in the hearth of the BF. From the hearth, the HM is tapped from the taphole of the BF after an interval of time. Normally in large BFs, HM tapping rates of 7 ton/min and liquid tapping velocities of 5 m/sec, in tap holes of 70 mm diameter and 3.5 m long, are typically encountered. The tapping rate of HM is strongly influenced by the taphole condition and taphole length. Generally the temperature of tapped HM varies in the range of 1420 deg C to 1480 deg C. The tapped HM is handled in the following three stages. Handling of the HM in the cast house i.e. from taphole to the hot metal ladles HM ladles and their transport Processing of HM either in the pig casting machine (PCM) for the production of pig iron (PI) or in the steel melting shop for making steel. Historical development of hot metal handling During the seventeenth century, the produced liquid iron (usually around 450 kg per cast) from the iron making furnace was drawn into a single trench or ladled into sand moulds to produce domestic products such as pots, pans, stove plates etc.  As the BF production increased due to many design improvements, removal of liquid products (iron and slag) became an issue. Production of charcoal BF had increased over the period from one ton to 25 tons per day. This higher tonnage could not be handled with two casts per day through a single trench in front of the tap hole. The cast house contained...

Tundish Metallurgy May08

Tundish Metallurgy

Tundish Metallurgy To transfer liquid steel from a teeming ladle to the continuous casting machine mould, an intermediate vessel, called a tundish, is used. Tundish is a rectangular big end up, refractory lined vessel, which may have a refractory lined lid on the top. The tundish bottom has one or more nozzle port(s) with slide gate(s) or stopper rod(s) for controlling the flow of liquid steel. Tundish is often divided into two sections namely (i) an inlet section, which generally has a pour box and where liquid steel is fed from the steel teeming ladle, and (ii) an outlet section from which liquid steel is fed into the continuous casting machine mould(s). Various flow control devices, such as dams, weirs, baffles with holes, etc., may be arranged along the length of the tundish. Longer path is preferred to prolong residence time of liquid steel to promote floatation of macro inclusions. Important tundish metallurgy elements of a tundish are shown in Fig 1. Fig 1 Important tundish metallurgy elements of a tundish The continuous casting tundish serves as a buffer and links the discontinuous process of the secondary steel making in the ladle with the continuous casting process in the mould. It acts as a reservoir during the ladle change periods and continues to supply liquid steel to the mould when incoming liquid steel is stopped, making sequential casting by a number of ladles possible. The main causes for inclusion formation and contamination of the liquid steel include reoxidation of the liquid steel by air and carried over oxidizing ladle slag, entrainment of tundish and ladle slag, and emulsification of these slags into the liquid steel. These inclusions must be floated out of the liquid steel during its flow through the tundish before being teemed...

Stainless Steel Manufacturing Processes May04

Stainless Steel Manufacturing Processes...

Stainless Steel Manufacturing Processes Stainless steels contain from 10 % to 30 % chromium. These steels also contain varying amounts of nickel, molybdenum, copper, sulphur, titanium, and niobium etc. The majority of production of stainless steel was through the electric arc furnace (EAF) till around 1970. With the use of tonnage oxygen in steel production, the EAF stainless steel making practice changed. Oxygen gas could be used for improving the decarburization rate. This could be achieved by injecting high oxygen potential but it was accompanied by the adverse reaction of extensive oxidation of chromium to the slag. This necessitated a well defined reduction period in which ferro silicon was used to reduce the oxidized chromium from the slag. Production of stainless steel started by duplex process with the successful development of argon oxygen decarburization (AOD) converter process. Though duplex process with AOD converter is the prominent one, there are several duplex processes are being used today for making stainless steels. In these processes there is an EAF or similar furnace that melts down scrap, ferroalloys and other raw materials to produce the liquid steel. This liquid steel, which contains most of chromium and nickel as well as some other alloying elements, is the charge of the converters. The converters are used to achieve low carbon stainless steels. The versatility of the EAF-AOD duplex process led steelmakers to re-examine the use of different converters for melting of stainless steels. This led to the development of several other converters for duplex processes. The development work to make stainless steels using conventional BOF (basic oxygen furnace) had begun in the late 1950s and early 1960s. By the mid 1960s, some steelmakers were using existing BOF converters for a partial decarburization followed by decarburization in a ladle under...