FASTMET and FASTMELT Processes of Ironmaking Nov15

FASTMET and FASTMELT Processes of Ironmaking...

FASTMET and FASTMELT Processes of Ironmaking Kobe Steel in collaboration with Midrex Technologies, Inc., a subsidiary of Kobe Steel in the USA, has developed the FASTMET process which is a coal based direct reduction process of iron making. The FASTMET process converts iron ore pellet feed, iron ore fines and/or metallurgical waste from the steel plant into direct reduced iron (DRI) using pulverized non coking coal as a reductant. The process uses a rotary hearth furnace (RHF) for the reduction reaction (Fig 1). The end product DRI can be hot briquetted (HBI), discharged as hot DRI into transfer containers, or cooled if cold DRI is needed. FASTMELT process is the FASTMET process with addition of an Electric Iron Melting Furnace (EIF) to produce liquid iron or hot metal. Hot DRI is directly discharged from the RHF into EIF and is melted to produce hot metal. Fig 2  A simplified cross section and plan view of a RHF The first commercial FASTMET plant was commissioned in April 2000 at Nippon Steel’s Hirohata works. A total of 5 plants have since been commissioned. The details of these plants are given in Table 1. Tab 1 FASTMET commercial plants Unit NSC Hirohata no. 1 NSC Hirohata no. 1 NSC Hirohata no. 1 JFE Fukuyama KSL Kakogawa RHF feed rate ton/Yr 190,000 190,000 190,000 190,000 16,000 Raw materials BOF dust BOF dust BOF dust BF dust, BOF dust BF dust, BOF dust, EAF dust Product application BOF feed, DRI BOF feed, DRI BOF feed, HBI BOF feed, DRI  BF & BOF feed, DRI It can be seen that this process is being presently used for utilization of the metallurgical waste of the steel plant. Besides metallurgical waste the process can also use iron ore fines having size which...

HIsarna process for iron making Jun28

HIsarna process for iron making...

HIsarna process for ironmaking HIsarna process is a smelting reduction process for producing liquid iron directly from iron ore fines (IOF) and coal. It represents a new, potentially more efficient way of making iron and is being developed for substantial reduction of carbon emissions from the ironmaking process. It is an initiative of ULCOS (ultra low CO2 steelmaking) consortium of European steelmakers and is a combination of HIsmelt technology of Rio Tinto and Isarna technology developed at Tata Ijmuiden. It eliminates prior processing of raw materials as needed by the blast furnace process. The process consists of pre-reduction of IOF in cyclone converter furnace (CCF) of Isarna technology and bath smelting of iron in smelting reduction vessel (SRV) of HIsmelt process. The process name derives by combining the names of the two technologies (‘HI’ from HIsmelt and ‘sarna’ from Isarna, a celtic word for iron). First attempt of applying cyclone technology for the reduction of iron ore was attempted at Koninklijke, Hoogovens in 1960s but was abandoned. Another serious attempt was made in 1986 but because of economic crisis, the project was put on hold until early 1990s. The project was revived when coke supply became scarce during mid 1990s. CCF technology was then developed at a pilot scale with capacities of 15-20 tons per hour (tph) of ore feed. The attempt was again halted in 1999 because of successful implementation of pulverized coal injections in the blast furnaces. HIsmelt was originally started by CRA (now Rio Tinto) in 1980s in a 2 tph pilot plant at Maxhutte, Germany followed by 8 tph pilot plant in Kwinana, Western Australia in the 1990s. Later in the first decade of present century, a commercial plant of 80 tph (60,000 tons per annum) was commissioned and operated at...