Ferro-Manganese

Ferro-Manganese Ferro-manganese (Fe-Mn) is a metallic ferro alloy which is added usually along with ferro-silicon (Fe-Si) as ladle addition during steelmaking. It is a ferroalloy composed principally of manganese (Mn) and iron (Fe), and normally contains much smaller proportions of minor elements, such as carbon (C), phosphorus (P), and sulphur (S). Fe-Mn is an important additive used as a deoxidizer in the production of steel. It is a master alloy of Fe and Mn with a minimum Mn content of 65 %, and maximum Mn content of 95 %. There are two families of Mn alloys. One is called Fe-Mn while the other is known as silico-manganese (Si-Mn). Around 93 % of all the Mn produced is in the form of Mn ferroalloys consists of the Fe-Mn grades and the Si-Mn grades. Mn plays an important role in the manufacturing of steel as deoxidizing, desulphurizing, and alloying agent. It is a mild deoxidizer than silicon (Si) but enhances the effectiveness of the latter due to the formation of stable manganese silicates and aluminates. Mn is used as an alloying element in almost all types of steel. Of particular interest is its modifying effect on the iron-carbon (Fe-C) system by increasing the hardenability of the steel. Fe-Mn is produced in a number of grades and sizes and is consumed in bulk form primarily in the production of steel as a source of Mn, although some Fe-Mn is also used as an alloying agent in the production of iron castings. Mn, which is intentionally present in nearly all steels, is used as a steel desulphurizer and deoxidizer. Mn improves the tensile strength, workability, toughness, hardness and resistance to abrasion. By removing S from steel, Mn prevents the steel from becoming brittle during the hot rolling process....

Sulphur in Steels

Sulphur in Steels  Sulphur (S) (atomic number 16 and atomic weight 32.066) has density of 2.05 gm/cc. Monoclinic S melts at 119.25 deg C and boils at 444.6 deg C. However, S and iron (Fe) are miscible, and Fe-S binary system at one atmosphere of pressure forms a liquid at temperatures as high as 1800 deg C, far above the boiling point of S alone. Fig 1 is the phase diagram of the Fe-S binary system at 1 atmosphere of pressure.  Fig 1 Fe-S phase diagram S is an element which is always present in steel in small quantities. S in steel is introduced through iron ore and fuel (coal and coke). The removal of S during steel making is a tedious and difficult process. S is normally regarded as an impurity in steel and is required to be reduced to the limits of practicality. However steels which are to be machined need a certain minimum S content for proper chip formation. Where machining constitutes a major fraction of the end products cost, many types of steel (carbon, alloy, and less often stainless) are intentionally resulphurized just for this reason. (refer http://ispatguru.com/free-cutting-steels/) Except in those cases where it is added for machinability, or where residual S content of around 0.040 % maximum is tolerable, the usual aim during iron and steel making is to reduce S to low levels, consistent with mechanical property requirements. For high strength (HS) steel plates and for some special bar quality (SBQ) steel products, this may mean removing the S to a level of 0.005 % maximum. There are several methods which are widely used for achieving this level of S. Further, efficient removal of S from liquid steel or iron depends on specific metallurgical and thermodynamic conditions. Though...