Liquid Fuels – Their Characteristics and Safety Requirements...

Liquid Fuels – Their Characteristics and Safety Requirements Liquid fuels are combustible or energy generating molecules that take the shape of their container. Most of the liquid fuels are derived from fossil fuels mainly from crude oil. Main liquid fuels used in iron and steel plant (Fig 1) are (i) furnace oil (FO), (ii) low sulphur heavy stock (LSHS), (iii) light diesel oil (LDO), and (iv) high speed diesel oil (HSD).  Coal tar fuel is a byproduct liquid fuel produced during the cleaning of the raw coke oven gas in the coke oven and byproduct plant. Liquid fuels are normally used in the steel plant for the production of steam for power generation, for heating purpose in various furnaces of the plant, for injection in blast furnace, and for the operation of locomotives and the mobile equipment. Fig 1 Liquid fuels used in a steel plant   Liquid fuels are chemically stable and incompatible with strong oxidizers. They do not react vigorously with common materials but can react with oxidizing agents. Liquid fuels are stored in a dry cool, well – ventilated area away from heat and flame. They are also kept away oxidizing agents. Furnace oil Furnace oil is a fuel oil which is dark and viscous. It is a residual fuel oil which is obtained by blending residual products from various refining processes with suitable diluent usually middle distillates to obtain the required fuel oil grades. The fuel oil grades are similar in nature and are being marketed under different specifications in various countries. Furnace oil is used mainly in different furnaces of the steel plant, in power plant boilers for raising steam and for injection in the blast furnace. It is also sometimes used in air preheaters. Furnace oil is having...