Metallurgical Coal

Metallurgical Coal Metallurgical coal is also called ‘met coal’ or ‘coking coal. It is a bituminous coal which allows the production of a coke suitable to support a blast furnace (BF) charge. It is distinguished by the strong low-density coke produced when the coal is heated in a low oxygen (O2) environment or in absence of air to reduce mineral impurities (e.g. less sulphur, phosphorus). On heating, the coal softens, and volatile components evaporate and escape through pores in the mass. On cooling, the resultant coke has swollen, becoming a larger volume. The strength and density of coke is particularly important when it is used in a BF, as the coke supports part of the ore and flux burden inside the BF. Metallurgical coal possesses the ability to soften and re-solidify into a coherent, porous mass, when heated from 300 deg C to 550 deg C in the absence of air in a confined space. The conversion from coal to coke occurs in chambers called coke ovens where the volatiles from the coal escape, leaving behind what is referred to as metallurgical coke, which reaches a temperature of around 1,000 deg C to 1200 deg C before being removed from the ovens. The coking cycle is normally dependent on several parameters. Coke is used primarily as a fuel and a reducing agent in a BF. The gross calorific value (CV) of the metallurgical coal is greater than 5700 kcal/kg on an ash?free but moist basis. It presents unique plastic properties during carbonization which in turn produces a porous solid, high in carbon (C) coke. Metallurgical coals, when heated at a moderate rate in the absence of air, undergo complex and continuous changes in chemical composition and physical character. During carbonization, most bituminous coals, except those bordering...