Defects in Thermo Mechanical Processing of Metals...

Defects in Thermo Mechanical Processing of Metals  Thermo mechanical processing of materials is a technique designed to improve the mechanical properties by controlling the hot-deformation process. This was originally designed to produce the required external shape of the product. Controlled rolling, controlled-cooling and direct-quenching are typical examples of thermo mechanical processing. Such processing saves energy in the manufacture of steel by minimizing or even eliminating the heat treatment after hot-deformation, thus increasing the productivity for high grade steels. It normally requires a change in alloy design and often reduces the productivity of the hot deformation process itself, but at the same time makes it possible to reduce the total amount of alloying additions and to improve weldability, while sometimes producing new and beneficial characteristics in the steel. Thermo mechanical processing is the sophisticated combination of well-defined deformation operations and well-defined heat treatment in a single production stage to control the microstructure of the material being formed. It produces materials with the desired external qualities (dimensions, shape and surface quality) and acceptable mechanical properties. The process is normally considered as the final stage in the production of steels. Thermo mechanical process defects are usually focused on individual forming technique. The defects generally range from mostly macroscopic ‘form and fracture’ related defects to defects related to strain localizations, as well as imperfections related to microstructure.  The defects in case of thermo mechanical processing have two possible origins namely (i) process related, and/or (ii) metallurgical. The first one is usually related fully to the practices of the thermo mechanical processes including the forming techniques and the heat treatment, while the metallurgical origin defects can range from the starting solidification structure to structural developments during thermo mechanical process. It is difficult to establish a clear demarcation between the...

Metal Forming Processes...

Metal Forming Processes Metal forming processes consists of deformation processes in which a metal work piece (billet, bloom, or blank) is shaped by tools or dies. The design and control of such processes depend on the characteristics of the material of the work piece, the requirements of the finished product, the conditions at the interface of the tool and the work piece, the mechanics of plastic deformation (metal flow), and the equipment used. These factors influence the selection of geometry and material of the tool as well as processing conditions (examples are temperatures of die and work piece and lubrication). Since many of the metalworking operations are rather complex, models of various types, such as analytical, physical, or numerical models, are often used to design these processes. A brief historical view, a classification of metalworking processes and equipment, and a summary of some of the more recent developments in the field are described below. Historical view Metalworking technology is one of three major technologies used for the fabrication of the metal products. The other two are casting process and powder metallurgy (P/M) technology. It is possibly the oldest and most established of the three technologies. The earliest records of metalworking show that the simple hammering of gold (Au) and copper (Cu) was practiced in various regions of the Middle East around 8000 BCE. The forming of these metals was crude since the skill of refining by smelting was not known and since the ability to work the material was limited by impurities that remained after the metal had been separated from its ore. With the start of Cu smelting around 4000 BCE, a useful method became available for purifying metals through chemical reactions in the liquid state. Later, in the Cu age, it was...

Basics of Rolling of Steel Nov21

Basics of Rolling of Steel...

Basics of Rolling of Steel  Liquid steel is usually cast in continuous casting machines in the shape of billets, blooms, or slabs. In some plants, it is also being cast in continuous casting machines in the shape of thin slabs or dog bone sections. These shapes are processed by hot rolling by passing them through plain or grooved cylindrical rotating rolls to produce plates, sheets, rods, structural sections, and tubes etc. Rolling process is one of the most important and widely used industrial metal forming operations. It provides high production and close control of the final product. It was developed in late 1500s. It accounts for 90 % of all metals produced by metal working processes. Rolling of steel is a metal forming process in which steel is passed through a pair of rotating rolls for plastic deformation of the steel. Plastic deformation is caused by the compressive forces applied through the rotating rolls. High compressive stresses are as a result of the friction between the rolls and the steel stock surface. The steel material gets squeezed between the pair of rolls, as a result of which the thickness gets reduced and the length gets increased. Rolling is classified according to the temperature of the steel rolled. If the temperature of the steel is above its recrystallization temperature, then the process is termed as hot rolling. If the temperature of the steel is below its recrystallization temperature, the process is termed as cold rolling. The rolls run on massive neck bearings mounted in housings of enormous strength and driven by powerful electric motors. These are known as mill stands. A rolling mill stand contains two or more rolls for plastic deformation of steel between rotating rolls. It basically consists of (i) rolls, (ii) bearings,...