Thermal Coal

Thermal Coal Thermal coal is a type of bituminous coal which is used to provide heat energy in combustion in various types of furnaces via the pulverized fuel method because of its high calorific value (CV). It is also sometimes called as non-coking coal, steam coal, or boiler coal. It includes all those bituminous coals which are not included under coking coal category. It is characterized by higher volatile matter (VM) than anthracite (more than 10 %) and lower carbon (C) content (less than 90 % fixed C). Its gross CV is greater than 5700 kcal/kg on an ash?free but moist basis. The greatest use of thermal coal is for the generation of steam in the boilers for the purpose of generation of electricity. Thermal coal is also used in some of the processes for ironmaking especially in the production of direct reduced iron (DRI) and in the smelting reduction processes for the production of hot metal (HM). Thermal coal is a complex heterogeneous substance. Hence, it has no fixed chemical formula. Its characteristics and hence its CV vary widely. Thermal coals like other coals also contain carbon (C), oxygen (O2), and hydrogen (H2). The other constituents in thermal coals include sulphur (S), nitrogen (N2), ash, chlorine (Cl), and sodium (Na). The quality of thermal of coals is based on the amount of C, O2, and H2 present in coal. The metallic elements in the thermal coal contribute to the coal ash. The chemical structure of the organic molecules of the thermal coal is very complex and is dependent on the rank of the coal. It varies from one coal to another coal. Typical structure of thermal coal is given in Fig 1. Fig 1 Typical structure of thermal coal The performance of the...

Non Coking Coal for Iron Production...

Non Coking Coal for Iron Production A non-coking coal is that coal which when heated in the absence of air leaves a coherent residue. This residue does not possess the physical and chemical properties of the coke and is not suitable for the manufacture of coke. Non coking coal like any other coal is an organic rock (as opposed to most other rocks in the earth’s crust, such as clays and sandstone, which are inorganic). It contains mostly carbon (C), but it also has hydrogen (H2), oxygen (O2), sulphur (S) and nitrogen (N2), as well as some inorganic constituents which are known as ash (minerals) and water (H2O). Coal was formed from prehistoric plants, in marshy environments, some tens or hundreds of millions of years ago. The presence of water restricted the supply of oxygen and allowed thermal and bacterial decomposition of plant material to take place, instead of the completion of the carbon cycle. Under these conditions of anaerobic decay, in the so-called biochemical stage of coal formation, a carbon-rich material called ‘peat’ was formed. In the subsequent geochemical stage, the different time-temperature histories led to the formations of coal of widely differing properties. These formations of coal are lignite (65 % to 72 % carbon), sub-bituminous coal (72 % to 76 % carbon), bituminous coal (76 % to 90 % carbon), and anthracite (90 % to 95 %) carbon. The degree of change undergone by a coal as it matures from peat to anthracite is known as coalification. Coalification has an important bearing on the physical and chemical properties of coal and is referred to as the ‘rank’ of the coal. Ranking is determined by the degree of transformation of the original plant material to carbon. The ranks of coals, from those with...