Silico- Manganese

Silico- Manganese Silico-manganese (Si-Mn) is a metallic ferro alloy which is being used to add both silicon (Si) and manganese (Mn) as ladle addition during steelmaking. Because of its lower carbon (C) content, it is a preferred ladle addition material during making of low carbon steels. Si-Mn is a ferroalloy composed principally of Mn, Si, and Fe (iron), and normally contains much smaller proportions of minor elements, such as C, phosphorus (P), and sulphur (S). The ferroalloy is also sometimes referred to as ferro-silicon-manganese. Both Mn and Si play an important role in the manufacturing of steel as deoxidizing, desulphurizing, and alloying agents. Si is the primary and more powerful deoxidizer. Mn is a milder deoxidizer than Si but enhances the effectiveness of the latter due to the formation of stable manganese silicates and aluminates. It also serves as desulphurizer. Mn is used as an alloying element in almost all types of steel. Of particular interest is its modifying effect on the iron-carbon (Fe-C) system by increasing the hardenability of the steel. There are two families of Mn alloys one is called Si-Mn while the other is known as ferro-manganese (Fe-Mn). Si-Mn adds additional silicon in liquid steel which is a stronger deoxidizer and which also helps to improve some mechanical properties of steel. In each family, content of C can be controlled and lowered when producing low C grades. Around 93 % of all the Mn produced is in the form of Mn ferroalloys consists of the Fe-Mn grades and the Si-Mn grades. The Fe-Mn grades are high carbon (HC), medium carbon (MC), low-carbon (LC) and very low carbon (VLC), whereas the Si-Mn grades include medium carbon (MC) and low carbon (LC). The steel industry is the only consumer of these alloys. However...

Production of Silico-Manganese in a Submerged Arc Furnace Jun09

Production of Silico-Manganese in a Submerged Arc Furnace...

Production of Silico-Manganese in a Submerged Arc Furnace Silico-manganese (Si-Mn) is an alloy used for adding both silicon (Si) and manganese (Mn) to liquid steel during steelmaking at low carbon (C) content. A standard Si-Mn alloy contains 65 % to 70 % Mn, 15 % to 20 % Si and 1.5 % to 2 % C. Si-Mn alloy grades are medium carbon (MC) and low carbon (LC). The steelmaking industry is the only consumer of this alloy. Use of Si-Mn during steelmaking in place of a mix of high carbon ferro-manganese (Fe-Mn) alloy and ferro-silicon (Fe-Si) alloy is driven by economic considerations. Both Mn and Si are crucial constituents in steelmaking. They are used as deoxidizers, desulphurizers and alloying elements. Si is the primary deoxidizer. Mn is a milder deoxidizer than Si but enhances the effectiveness due to the formation of stable manganese silicates and aluminates. It also serves as desulphurizer. Manganese is used as an alloying element in almost all types of steel. Of particular interest is its modifying effect on the iron-carbon (Fe-C) system by increasing the hardenability of the steel. Si-Mn is produced by carbo-thermic reduction of oxidic raw materials in a three-phase, alternating current (AC), submerged arc furnace (SAF) which is also being used for the production of Fe-Mn. Operation of the process for the Si-Mn production is often more difficult than the Fe-Mn production process since higher process temperature is needed. The common sizes of the SAF used for the production of Si-Mn are normally in the range 9 MVA to 40 MVA producing 45 tons to 220 tons of Si-Mn per day. In the carbo-thermic reduction of oxidic raw materials, heat is just as essential for reduction as C is, due to the endothermic reduction reactions and a...

Steelmaking in Induction Furnace May24

Steelmaking in Induction Furnace...

Steelmaking in Induction Furnace Coreless induction furnaces have been used in the ferrous industry for over 50 years and are now one of the most popular means of melting and holding ferrous materials. Induction melting had dramatic growth during the 1960s based on line frequency technology, and later with the large-scale introduction of medium frequency power supply during the 1980s. Making of mild steel in the induction furnace was first experimented during early 1980s and it gained popularity when the production of sponge iron utilizing coal based process of rotary kilns became popular. Induction furnace is a type of electric melting furnace which uses electric current to melt metal. The principle of induction melting is that a high voltage electrical source from a primary coil induces a low voltage, high current in the metal (secondary coil). Induction heating is simply a method of transfer of the heat energy. Two laws which govern induction heating are (i) electromagnetic induction, and (ii) the joule effect. Coreless induction furnace comprises a relatively thin refractory crucible encircled by a water cooled copper coil excited from a single AC supply. When the coil is energized, the fluctuating axial magnetic field causes a current to flow in electrically conducting pieces of charge material within the crucible. The power induced in the charge depends on the physical properties of the material, the flux linking it and its geometric shape. Dependent on the resistivity of the material being melted, the coreless induction furnace converts electrical energy to heat the charge at an efficiency of between 50 % and 85 %, although furnace efficiency is further reduced by thermal losses from radiation from the melt surface and conduction through the furnace lining. Medium frequency induction furnaces which are commonly used for steelmaking use...

Materials needed for Steel Production in Basic Oxygen Furnace Oct16

Materials needed for Steel Production in Basic Oxygen Furnace...

Materials needed for Steel Production in Basic Oxygen Furnace The following types of materials are needed for the production of liquid steel in the basic oxygen furnace (BOF) steelmaking process (Fig 1). Basic raw materials such as hot metal, scrap, and lime etc. Secondary raw materials such as deoxidizers and carburizers. Utility gases such as oxygen, nitrogen, and argon etc. Refractories and Refractory materials such as lining material, gunning material and patching materials etc. Consumable probes such as temperature probes and sampling probes etc. Cooling water for cooling of oxygen blowing lance and exhaust gases. Fig 1 Materials needed for the production of steel in basic oxygen furnace Basic raw Materials The basic raw materials needed for making steel in the BOF converter include (i) hot metal from the blast furnace, (ii) steel scrap and/or any other metallic iron source, (iii) iron ore, and (iv) fluxes.  Scrap, charged from a scrap box, is the first material to be charged into the BOF. The hot metal is then poured into the converter from a hot metal charging ladle, after which the blowing with oxygen gas is started. The fluxes, usually in lump form, are charged into the BOF through a bin system after the start of the oxygen blow. The fluxes can also be injected into the furnace in powder form through bottom tuyeres. The composition and amounts of basic raw materials used in the BOF converter vary from one steel melting shop to another, depending on their availability and the economics of the process. The hot metal or liquid iron is the primary source of iron units and energy. Hot metal is received from the blast furnaces in either open top or torpedo cars. In case of open top ladles, hot metal is poured...

Noble ferroalloys

Noble ferroalloys Ferroalloys are a group of materials which are alloys of iron that contain a high percentage of one or more non ferrous metals as alloying elements. These alloys are used for the addition of these other elements into liquid metal. They are normally used as addition agents. More than 85 % of ferroalloys produced are used primarily in the manufacture of steel. Ferroalloys are usually classified into two main categories namely (i) bulk ferroalloys and (ii) noble or special ferroalloys. Noble ferroalloys are of high value and consumed in low proportions. These ferroalloys are one of the vital inputs required for the production of special types of steels and are used as additive inputs especially in the production of alloy and special steels. Noble ferroalloys (Fig 1) are ferro nickel (Fe-Ni), ferro molybdenum (Fe-Mo), ferro vanadium (Fe-V), ferro  tungsten (Fe-W), ferro niobium (Fe-Nb), ferro titanium (Fe-Ti), ferro aluminum (Fe-Al), ferro boron (Fe-B). There are some noble ferroalloys which are having more than one non ferrous metal as alloying elements. Examples are ferro silico magnesium (Fe-Si-Mg), ferro silico zirconium (Fe-Si-Zr), ferro nickel magnesium (Fe-Ni-Mg) etc. Fig 1 Noble Ferroalloys Ferro nickel Fe-Ni is used for alloying in the production of stainless and construction steels. Laterite ore is the main raw material for the production of Fe-Ni. Laterite ore is characterized by a relatively low nickel content and a high moisture content together with chemically bound water in the form of hydroxide. Typical laterite ore contains 1 % to 3 % Ni and a moisture content of 5 % to 10 %. Besides laterite ore, coke and/or coal is needed as a reducing agent, since Fe-Ni production takes place by a carbothermic process. Fe-Ni can also be produced from secondary raw materials, such as...