Effective Decisions

Effective Decisions Making a decision is comparable to giving a verdict. It is a choice between different alternatives. It is seldom a choice between wrong and right. It is mostly a choice between ‘almost right’ and ‘perhaps wrong’. It is very often a choice between two courses of action neither of which can be considered more correct than the other. Most of the literature on decision making advises that the decision maker is to find the facts first. But it is also a point that management executives who make effective decisions are aware that one does not start with facts. Instead, they start with opinions. These opinions are, naturally, nothing but untested suppositions and, hence, worthless unless tested against reality. To determine what is a fact, requires first a decision on the criteria of relevance, especially on the suitable measurement. This is the core of the effective decision, and usually it is the most controversial aspect. Further, most of the literature on decision making states that the effective decisions flow from a consensus on the facts. To the contrary, the understanding which underlies the right decision grows out of the clash and conflict of divergent opinions and out of the serious consideration of competing alternatives. To obtain the facts first is impossible. There are no facts unless one has a norm of relevance. Events by themselves are not facts. As an example, the taste or colour of a substance is not a fact in physics, while in cooking the taste is a fact of highest importance, and in painting, the colour matters the most. Physics, cooking, and painting consider different things as relevant and therefore consider different things to be facts. Executive, who is making effective decisions, also knows that people do not start...