Limestone and Lime

Limestone and Lime Limestone is an odorless white, grayish-white or tan material that ranges from sized stone to a granular powder. It is often described as the most versatile mineral. Limestone is the name given to any rock formed which consists mostly of calcium carbonate (CaCO3), but to geologists, limestone is only one of several types of carbonate rocks. These rocks are composed of more than 50 % carbonate minerals, generally containing the mineral calcite (pure CaCO3). Limestone is a sedimentary rock composed mainly of CaCO3. It is formed by the deposition either of the skeletons of small creatures and/or plants (organic limestones), or by chemical precipitation, or by deposition of fragments of limestone rock, on the beds of seas and lakes. Limestones are contaminated to a greater or lesser extent by the deposition of sand or clay which is the source of the impurities usually found in the limestone. Generally there is a difference in quality in a deposit from one layer to the next. The purest carbonates and the most suitable from the production point of view tend to be the thick bedded type. Carbonate deposits may be found in horizontal layers as deposited, or at an angle from the horizontal due to earth movements. They will vary in density, hardness and chemical purity. Limestone rocks are extremely common and make up a significant portion of the crust of the Earth. They serve as one of the largest carbon repositories on our planet. The properties of limestone make it one of the most widely used minerals. Some limestones may contain small percentage of magnesium carbonate (MgCO3). These limestones are known as dolomitic limestones. Impurities (such as clay, sand, organic remains, iron oxide, and other materials) cause limestones to show different colours, especially with weathered surfaces. Limestone may be crystalline, clastic, granular,...