Direct Iron Ore Smelting Process for Ironmaking Mar28

Direct Iron Ore Smelting Process for Ironmaking...

Direct Iron Ore Smelting Process for Ironmaking Direct iron ore smelting (DIOS) process is a smelting reduction process for the production of hot metal (liquid iron). It is a two-stage process which has been developed in Japan. It uses non-coking coal in a powder or granular form to smelt iron ore fines into liquid iron (hot metal) and hence, there is no necessity of a coke ovens plant and a sintering plant. The ore fines are pre-reduced in a fluidized bed furnace and are charged in the smelting reduction furnace along with non-coking coal and fluxes. Oxygen is blown into the smelting reduction furnace. The two stages of the DIOS process consists of (i) pre reduction of iron ore in preliminary reduction furnace (PRF), and (ii) the final reduction and melting in the smelting reduction furnace (SRF). The pre reduction of the ore is carried out in two steps utilizing the exhaust gas from the SRF. Each of the steps uses a fluidized bed reactor which is designed as a vertical furnace. The development of the DIOS process started in 1988 in Japan as a joint research project among eight iron manufacturing companies who had, prior to 1988, been studying the smelting-reduction process individually. This project was sponsored by MITI, the Japanese Ministry of International Trade and Industry. Japanese companies and Japan Iron and Steel Federation (JISF) actively supported the development of the process during the period of 1988 to 1996. Core technology study necessary for the construction of the pilot plant was done during the period 1988 to 1990. During this period core technologies were established. These core technologies include (i) an increase in the thermal efficiency of a SRF, (ii) the technology to be integrated with a PRF, (iii) the technology for...

Development of Smelting Reduction Processes for Ironmaking Mar08

Development of Smelting Reduction Processes for Ironmaking...

Development of Smelting Reduction Processes for Ironmaking Smelting reduction (SR) processes are the most recent development in the production technology of hot metal (liquid iron). These processes combine the gasification of non-coking coal with the melt reduction of iron ore. Energy intensity of SR processes is lower than that of blast furnace (BF), since the production of coke is not needed and the need for preparation of iron ore is also reduced. SR ironmaking process was conceived in the late 1930s. The history of the development of SR processes goes back to the 1950s. The laboratory scale fundamental studies on the SR of iron ore were started first by Dancy in 1951. However, serious efforts started from 1980 onwards. There have been two separate lines of development of primary ironmaking technology during the second half of twentieth century. The first line of development was centred on the BF which remained the principal process unit for the hot metal production. In general, this line of the development did not encompass any radical process changes in the furnace itself. It proceeded through a gradual evolution which involved (i) increase in the furnace size, (ii) improvement in the burden preparation, (iii) increase in the top pressure, (iv) increase of hot blast temperature, (v) bell-less charging and improvements in burden distribution, (vi) improvements in refractories and cooling systems, (vii) injection of auxiliary fuels (fuel gas, liquid fuel, or pulverized coal) and enrichment of hot air blast with oxygen (O2), and (viii) application of automation as well as improvements in instrumentation and control technology. The continued success of the ironmaking in BF reflects the very high levels of thermal and chemical efficiencies which can be achieved during the production of hot metal and the consequent cost advantages. In fact,...