Role of Concentration and Priorities in Effectiveness...

Role of Concentration and Priorities in Effectiveness Both the concentration and setting of priorities play a major role in an executive’s effectiveness. In fact, an effective executive does first things first and he does one thing at a time. The need of concentration is embedded both in the nature of the executive job as well as in him as a person. There are many apparent reasons for this. There are always more important contributions to be made than there is time available to make them. If someone analyses the richness of the important tasks to which the executive contributes and the time available with the executive for the tasks, then he comes up with an embarrassing situation which reveals a scarcity of time available for the work that really contributes. It is a fact that no matter how well the executive manages his time, the greater part of it is still not his own and hence, there is always a time deficit. The more an executive focuses on upward contribution, the more he needs fairly big continuous shares of his time. The more he switches from being busy for the achievement of the results, the more he has to make sustained efforts and these efforts require a fairly large quantity of time to bear fruit. And to ensure that this time which is really productive is available, the executive needs self-discipline and a very strong determination to say ‘No’. Similarly, the more the executive makes efforts at making strengths productive, the more he becomes conscious of the necessity to concentrate on the human strengths available to him on major opportunities. This is the only way to get results. But concentration is dictated also by the fact that most of the persons find it hard...

Effective Decisions

Effective Decisions Making a decision is comparable to giving a verdict. It is a choice between different alternatives. It is seldom a choice between wrong and right. It is mostly a choice between ‘almost right’ and ‘perhaps wrong’. It is very often a choice between two courses of action neither of which can be considered more correct than the other. Most of the literature on decision making advises that the decision maker is to find the facts first. But it is also a point that management executives who make effective decisions are aware that one does not start with facts. Instead, they start with opinions. These opinions are, naturally, nothing but untested suppositions and, hence, worthless unless tested against reality. To determine what is a fact, requires first a decision on the criteria of relevance, especially on the suitable measurement. This is the core of the effective decision, and usually it is the most controversial aspect. Further, most of the literature on decision making states that the effective decisions flow from a consensus on the facts. To the contrary, the understanding which underlies the right decision grows out of the clash and conflict of divergent opinions and out of the serious consideration of competing alternatives. To obtain the facts first is impossible. There are no facts unless one has a norm of relevance. Events by themselves are not facts. As an example, the taste or colour of a substance is not a fact in physics, while in cooking the taste is a fact of highest importance, and in painting, the colour matters the most. Physics, cooking, and painting consider different things as relevant and therefore consider different things to be facts. Executive, who is making effective decisions, also knows that people do not start...