Importance of Communication in the Organization...

Importance of Communication in the Organization Communication has been derived from the Latin word ‘communis’, meaning to share. It is considered to be the exchange of an information, thought and emotion between individuals of groups. It plays a fundamental role in balancing the objectives of the employees and the organization. It consists of the activity of conveying information. Hence, it requires a sender, a message, and an intended recipient, although the receiver need not be present or aware of the sender’s intent to communicate at the time of communication. Hence, communication can occur across vast distances in time and space. Communication requires that the communicating parties share an area of communicative commonality. The process of communication (Fig 1) is complete once the receiver has understood the message of the sender. Feedback is critical for effective communication between the sender and the receiver of the message. Organizational communication is one of the important segments of the communication. Fig 1 Process of communication The two most common definitions of communication are (i) communication is sending and receiving of messages by means of symbols and in that context organizational communication is a key element of organizational climate, and (ii) communication is transfer of information from sender to receiver under the condition that the receiver understands the message. Communication is a process which is transactional (i.e., it involves two or more persons interacting within an environment) and symbolic (i.e., communication transactions ‘stand for’ other things, at various levels of abstraction). An organization involves a social collectivity (or a group of persons) in which activities are coordinated in order to achieve both individual and collective goals. By coordinating activities, some degree of organizational structure is created to assist employees in dealing with each other and with others in the...

Operational Discipline in Steel Industry...

Operational Discipline in Steel Industry Operational discipline means complying with a set of ‘well thought out’ and ‘well defined’ processes, and consistently executing them correctly. Striving to achieve operational excellence is one of the most important contributors to the steel industry’s sustainable performance and growth. Steel organization which reach for a higher level of operational excellence reap numerous benefits namely (i) a systemic, evolving and effective approach to its operations (ii) a continually productive and innovative workforce, and (iii) an organization which consistently achieves sustainable growth and increasing valuation. It is not uncommon to confuse operational discipline with operational excellence. While the two are closely linked, yet the latter cannot be realized without the former.  Operational discipline is but one important component among others which one can find on the path of the operational excellence. DuPont defines operational discipline as ‘the deeply rooted dedication and commitment by every member of an organization to carry out each task the right way every time’. In short, operational discipline can be stated as ‘everyone in the organization doing it right every time’. It means complying with a set of well thought out and well defined processes, and consistently executing them correctly. It is an essential ingredient when trying to achieve operational excellence. Operational discipline provides an organized and systematic way to complete tasks and implement operational changes through a fundamental set of procedures which are specific to the steel organization’s unique product. Regardless of the final products of the steel plant, operational discipline increases reliability and decreases the risk of the occurrence of a high magnitude incident. This is much easier said than done. However, building a culture in the organization around the pillars of operational discipline is the most effective way towards the achievement of this...

Corrosion of Carbon Steels...

Corrosion of Carbon Steels Carbon (C) steel is the most widely used engineering material. Despite its relatively limited corrosion resistance, C steels are used in large tonnages in marine applications, power plants (both nuclear based power and fossil fuel based power), metal processing equipment, power transmission, transportation, chemical processing, petroleum production and refining, pipelines, mining, and construction etc. The annual cost of metallic corrosion to the total economy of a country is very high. Because C steels represent the largest single class of alloys in use, both in terms of tonnage and total cost, it is easy to understand that the corrosion of C steels is a problem of enormous practical importance. This, of course, is the reason for the existence of entire industries devoted to providing protective systems for iron and steel. Because of corrosion, the design aspects are also very important. Indeed, design changes are often the most efficient manner of dealing with a particular corrosion problem. C steels also often called mild steels have limited alloy content, usually less than 2 % of the total of all the additions. These levels of additions do not generally produce any remarkable changes in general corrosion behaviour. One possible exception to this statement is the weathering steels, in which small additions of copper (Cu), chromium (Cr), nickel (Ni), and/or phosphorus (P) produce significant reductions in corrosion rate in certain environments. At the levels present in the C steels, the usual impurities have no significant effect on corrosion rate in the atmosphere, neutral waters, or soils. Only in the case of acid attack is an effect observed. In this latter case, the presence of P and sulphur (S) markedly increase the rate of attack. Indeed, in acid systems, the pure irons appear to show the...

Managing the Safety and Health at Workplace...

Managing the Safety and Health at Workplace  An organization’s performance depends on the performance of its employees and the employees’ performance show vast improvement if the work is carried out by them in a workplace which is safe and has a healthy environment. Safe and healthy workplaces are always the most efficient. In fact the two go hand in hand. Also, a bad accident due to the lack of safety and healthy environment at the workplace can bring a serious damage to the organization. Safety and health at the workplace is part of the organizational management, just like production and quality. Safety and health affects production, quality, and the financial results. So it is required to be managed in the same way as other aspects such as product development, distribution, marketing, sales targets or any other management issue in the organization. It is important that management plans for it, invests in it, manages it and regulates it. In short, safety and health at workplace is an intrinsic part of the organizational management. Safety and health at the workplace is essential for preventing injury and illness to the employees at the workplace. Therefore, it is about protecting the organization’s most valuable asset which is its workers. By making available safe and healthy working environment at the workplace, the organization reduces the lost work hours and hence the cost which is associated with it. It also eliminates the interruption to the operations with resultant increase in productivity and quality. A safe and healthy workplace raises employees’ morale and thus is one of the keys to organizational success. Safe and healthy workplaces have more satisfied and productive employees (i) who produce higher quality products or/and services, (ii) return to work more quickly after an injury or illness,...

Employees Loyalty and the Organization...

Employees Loyalty and the Organization It is often said that it is extremely important for the organizations to provide a healthy work environment, in order to attract and retain qualified, highly committed, and loyal workforce, because committed and loyal employees reinforce employees’ motivation to act in the best interest of organizations they work for. Employees’ loyalty is important for the organization because employees are a vital resource for the organization, especially since they represent a significant investment in term of locating, recruiting, training let alone salaries, welfare plans, bonuses and rewards etc. Loyalty, as a general term, signifies a person’s devotion or sentiment of attachment to a particular object, which may be another person or group of persons, an ideal, a duty, or a cause. It expresses itself in both thought and action and strives for the identification of the interests of the loyal person with those of the object. Employee loyalty can be defined as a psychological attachment or commitment to the organization and develops as a result of increased satisfaction. Satisfaction results from a process of internal evaluation, and if an employee’s expectation level is met or exceeded, then satisfaction grows. Employee loyalty then develops into a generalized emotional attitude towards the organization. In other words, the more satisfied an employee is regarding his working environment, the more likely that he develops a sense of commitment towards the organization in general. Employees’ loyalty towards organization is often referred as organizational loyalty of the employees. It is the most important factor that determines the effectiveness and efficiency of the organization. It is the one of the key elements that measures the compatibility between employees on one hand and the organization on the other hand, since if this compatibility increases, the organization achieves a...