Developments of Steelmaking Processes Feb22

Developments of Steelmaking Processes...

Developments of Steelmaking Processes The earliest known production of steel are pieces of ironware excavated from an archaeological site in Anatolia and are nearly 4,000 years old, dating from 1800 BCE (before common era). Horace identified steel weapons like the falcata in the Iberian Peninsula, while Noric steel was used by the Roman army. The reputation of ‘Seric iron’ of South India (wootz steel) amongst the Greeks, Romans, Egyptians, East Africans, Chinese and the Middle East grew considerably. South Indian and Mediterranean sources including Alexander the Great (3rd century BCE) recount the presentation and export to the Greeks of such steel. Metal production sites in Sri Lanka employed wind furnaces driven by the monsoon winds, capable of producing high-carbon (C) steel. Large-scale wootz steel production in Tamilakam using crucibles and C sources such as the plant Avaram occurred by the sixth century BCE, the pioneering precursor to modern steel production and metallurgy. Steel was produced in large quantities in Sparta around 650 BCE. The Chinese of the Warring states period (403 BCE to 221 BCE) had quenched hardened steel, while Chinese of the Han dynasty (202 BCE to 220 CE) created steel by melting together wrought iron with cast iron, gaining an ultimate product of a carbon-intermediate steel by the 1st century CE (common era). The Haya people of East Africa invented a type of furnace they used to make C steel at 1,800 deg C nearly 2,000 years ago. East African steel has been suggested by Richard Hooker to date back to 1400 BCE. Evidence of the earliest production of high C steel in the Indian subcontinent is found in Kodumanal in Tamilnadu, Golkonda in Telengana, and Karnataka and in Samanalawewa areas of Sri Lanka. This steel known as wootz steel, produced by about sixth century BCE was exported globally. The steel technology existed prior to 326 BCE in the region as they are mentioned in...

Design Features of an AC Electric Arc Furnace Feb24

Design Features of an AC Electric Arc Furnace...

Design Features of an AC Electric Arc Furnace  Electric arc furnace (EAF) used for steel making apply high current and low voltage electric energy to the charge materials , and thereby melt and refine them. EAF is a batch furnace which consists of a refractory lined vessel covered with a retractable roof through which electrodes enter the furnace. General features of a typical AC electric arc furnace is shown in Fig 1. Fig 1 General features of an AC electric arc furnace  EAF has a large bowl shaped body with a dish shaped hearth. The shell has a refractory lining inside. The reaction chamber of the furnace is covered from above by a removable roof made of refractory bricks held by a roof ring. It is fed with a three phase alternating current (AC) and has three graphite electrodes which are connected by flexible cables and water cooled copper tubes. The design of electric arc furnaces has changed considerably in recent years. Emphasis has been placed on making furnaces larger, increasing power input rates to the furnace and increasing the speed of furnace movements in order to minimize power off time in furnace operations. Modern steel melting shops with EAFs usually employ a mezzanine furnace installation. In this type of installation, the furnace sits on an upper level above the shop floor. The furnace is supported on a platform which can take on several different configurations. In the half platform configuration, the electrode column support and roof lifting gantry is hinged to the tiltable platform during operation and tapping. When charging the furnace, the complete assembly is lifted and swiveled. This design allows for the shortest electrode arm configuration. In the full platform design, the electrode column support and roof lifting assembly is completely...