Tensile Testing of Steel...

Tensile Testing of Steel Sample of steel is subjected to a wide variety of mechanical tests to measure their strength, elastic constants, and other material properties as well as their performance under a variety of actual use conditions and environments. Tensile test is one of them. Other tests are hardness test, impact test, fatigue test, and fracture test. These mechanical tests are used to measure how a sample of steel withstands an applied mechanical force. The results of such tests are used for two primary purposes namely (i) engineering design (e.g. failure theories based on strength, or deflections based on elastic constants and component geometry), and (ii) quality control either by the producer of steel to verify the process or by the end user to confirm the material specifications. Uniaxial tensile test is known as a basic and universal engineering test to achieve material parameters such as ultimate tensile strength (UTS), yield strength (YS), % elongation, % area of reduction and young’s modulus. Tensile testing is done for many reasons. The results of tensile tests are used in selecting materials for engineering applications. Tensile properties are often included in material specifications to ensure quality. Tensile properties are also normally measured during development of new materials and processes, so that different materials and processes can be compared. Also, tensile properties are generally used to predict the behaviour of a material under forms of loading other than uniaxial tension. Safely withstanding the expected maximum load without permanent deformation (or to stay within the specified deflection) is a basic requirement for a steel product. The ‘resistance’ against the load is a function of the cross-section and the mechanical properties (or in other words the ‘strength’) of the steel material. Tensile testing is done to determine the mechanical...