Blast Furnace Tap Hole and Tapping of the Furnace Apr23

Blast Furnace Tap Hole and Tapping of the Furnace...

Blast Furnace Tap Hole and Tapping of the Furnace The operation of a blast furnace is a continuous process. The blast furnace continues to produce liquid iron (hot metal) and slag as long as it is in operation. The hot metal and slag accumulate in the hearth of the furnace, but since there is a limit to the amount that can be accumulated before it interferes with the furnace operation, hot metal and slag must be removed from the furnace at regular intervals. The tap hole also known as iron notch, is used for tapping the hot metal from the furnace. It is located slightly above the floor of the hearth. Regardless of the specific tap hole configuration or operating philosophy, due to the addition of dynamic (often periodic) and more intense process conditions (exposure to higher temperatures leading to accelerated corrosion,  greater turbulence, and elevated rates of mass and heat transfer), and higher concurrent thermo-mechanical forces (from thermal or flow shear stresses), the performance and longevity of the blast furnace is intimately linked to the performance of the tap hole. Hence tap hole is very critical to the blast furnace. It is the heart and the lifeline of the blast furnace since without a tap hole a blast furnace cannot exist. The criticality and relevance of tap hole continues even in the modern automated blast furnaces. Tap hole is an essential part of a blast furnace. Large furnaces usually have 2 to 4 tap holes and the drainage of hot metal and slag is practically continuous by periodically drilling and plugging the tap holes with one of the tap holes is always open and two alternate tapings usually overlap for some period of time. Medium or small sized blast furnaces have normally one...