Dolomite – A Useful Mineral...

Dolomite – A Useful Mineral Dolomite is also known as dolostone and dolomite rock.  It is a sedimentary rock which primarily consists of the mineral dolomite. It is found in sedimentary basins worldwide. Dolomite rock is similar to limestone rock. Both dolomite and limestone rocks share the same colour ranges of white-to-gray and white-to-light brown (although other colours such as red, green, and black are also possible). Both the rocks have approximately the same hardness, and they are both soluble in dilute hydrochloric (HCl) acid. The original mineral name ‘dolomie’ was given by NT Saussare, in 1792, in honor of the French geologist Deodat Guy de Dolomieu (1750–1801). Dolomite, the rock, contains a large proportion of dolomite the mineral. Ideal dolomite has a crystal lattice consisting of alternating layers of Ca and Mg, separated by layers of CO3 and is typically represented by a stoichiometric chemical composition of CaMg(CO3)2, where calcium and magnesium are present in equal proportions. Dolomite originates in the same sedimentary environments as limestone i.e. in warm, shallow, marine environments where calcium carbonate (CaCO3) mud accumulates in the form of shell debris, fecal material, coral fragments, and carbonate precipitates. Dolomite is thought to form when the calcite in carbonate mud or limestone is modified by magnesium-rich groundwater. The available magnesium facilitates the conversion of calcite into dolomite. This chemical change is known as dolomitization. Dolomitization can completely alter a limestone into a dolomite, or it can partially alter the rock to form a dolomitic limestone. Dolomite is a complex mineral. It is relatively a soft mineral which can be easily crushed to a soft powder. The mineral is an anhydrous carbonate mineral consisting of a double carbonate of calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg). It is chemically represented by CaMg(CO3)2 or CaCO3.MgCO3. It theoretically contains...

Dolomite – Its Processing and Application in Iron and Steel Industry Jun28

Dolomite – Its Processing and Application in Iron and Steel Industry...

Dolomite – Its Processing and Application in Iron and Steel Industry Dolomite is an anhydrous carbonate mineral. It is a double carbonate of calcium and magnesium (CaCO3.MgCO3). It is one of the important raw materials used in production of iron and steel. Dolomite contains theoretically 54.35 % of CaCO3 and 45.65 % of MgCO3 or 30.41 % of CaO, 21.86 % of MgO, and 47.73 % of CO2. However, in nature, dolomite is not available in this exact proportion. Hence generally the rock containing in the range of 40 % to 45 % of MgCO3 is usually called dolomite. The main uses of dolomite in iron and steel industry are (i) as a fluxing material (ii) for protection of refractory lining, and (iii) as a refractory raw material. Dolomite in iron and steel industry is normally used in three forms. These are (i) raw dolomite which is also the natural form of dolomite, (ii) calcined dolomite, and (iii) sintered dolomite. When dolomite is used as a fluxing material then it is used as either raw dolomite or calcined dolomite. When dolomite is used for the protection of refractories, it is used in calcined form and when dolomite is being used as a refractory raw material, it is used in the form of sintered dolomite. The uses and form of dolomite in iron and steel industry is shown in Fig 1. Fig 1 Uses and form of dolomite in iron and steel industry Processing of dolomite Dolomite after its mining has to undergo several processing before it can be used in various processes. The basic processes in the production of dolomite are (i) quarrying of raw dolomite, (ii) preparing mined dolomite for its use by crushing and sizing, (iii) calcining of raw dolomite, (iv) processing...

Coal based Direct Reduction Rotary Kiln Process Feb14

Coal based Direct Reduction Rotary Kiln Process...

Coal based Direct Reduction Rotary Kiln Process The coal based direct reduction rotary kiln process was developed for converting iron ore directly into metallic iron without the melting of the materials. The process has the advantage of low capital expenditure and no requirement of coking coal. The metallic iron in this process is produced by the reduction of iron oxide below the fusion temperature of iron ore (1535 deg C) by utilizing carbonaceous material present in the non-coking coal. As the iron ore is in direct contact with the reducing agent throughout the reduction process, it is often termed as direct reduced iron (DRI). The reduced product having high degree of metallization shows a ‘honeycomb structure’, due to which it is often called sponge iron. Coal based DRI plants are flexible with respect to plant location since non-coking coal is widely distributed in large deposits and is easy to transport. Most plants employ reduction process which is carried out in rotary kilns. These plants use wide variety of raw materials and non-coking coal. The quality of these materials has direct bearing on the process as well as the product. Some plants do not use iron ore directly. These plants use iron ore pellets in the rotary kiln. Raw material mix consisting of iron ore, dolomite and non-coking coal is fed at the one end of the rotary kiln and is heated by coal burners to produce DRI. The product DRI along with char (sometimes called dolo char) is taken out from the other end of the kiln. Apart from this, primary air and secondary air are supplied to the kiln to initiate the combustion and sustain the reaction process in the kiln. Raw materials The main raw materials for the production of DRI by...

Basic Shaped Refractories...

Basic Shaped Refractories  Basic shaped refractories are those refractories which have resistance to corrosive reactions with chemically basic slags, dusts and fumes at elevated temperatures. They are both MgO and CaO based refractories or in combination between them or in combination between MgO and Cr2O3. These refractories belong to MgO- CaO equilibrium system as shown in Fig 1. Fig 1 MgO-CaO equilibrium system  Broadly basic refractories falls into one of the following five compositional categories (Fig 2). Products based on dead burned magnesite (DBM) or magnesia. These products are known as magnesite bricks. Products based on DBM or magnesia in combination with chrome containing materials such as chrome ore. Chrome containing magnesite bricks with about 5 % to 15 % Cr2O3 are known as magnesite chrome bricks while those with 15 % to 30 % chromium are called chrome magnesite bricks. DBM or magnesia in combination with spinel. In these basic bricks magnesia-rich spinel (MgO.Al2O3) replaces chrome ore. These bricks are called magnesite spinel bricks. DBM or magnesia in combination with carbon. These bricks are known as magnesite carbon bricks. Dolomitic products. These bricks are known as sintered dolomite bricks. Fig 2 Categories of basic shaped refractories based on composition  Basic refractories are characterized by an extremely high refractoriness and good resistance to basic slags. Compared to fireclay bricks they do not have glassy phase. These refractories have low resistance both to thermal shocks and creep at temperatures close to 1500 deg C. The chemical-physical characteristics together with a very high thermal capacity and thermal conductivity make basic refractories ideal refractories for steel making processes. Hence basic refractories received increased importance with the introduction of basic oxygen steel making process. One of the more important types of magnesite bricks are those which have low...

Limestone and dolomite flux and their use in iron and steel plant...

Limestone and dolomite flux and their use in iron and steel plant Limestone is a naturally occurring mineral. The term limestone is applied to any calcareous sedimentary rock consisting essentially of carbonates.  The ore is widely available geographically all over the world. Earth’s crust contains more than 4 % of calcium carbonate. Limestone is basically calcite which is theoretically composed of exclusively calcium carbonate (CaCO3). When limestone contains a certain portion of magnesium, it is called dolomite or dolomitic limestone (CaCO3.MgCO3). Dolomite theoretically contains CaCO3 54.35 % and MgCO3 45.65 % or CaO 30.4 %, MgO 21.9 % and CO2 47.7 %. However, in nature, dolomite is not available in this exact proportion. Hence generally the rock containing 40-45 % MgCO3 is usually called dolomite. When MgCO3 is less than 40 % but more than 20 % then the limestone is called dolomitic limestone. The chemical composition of limestone and dolomite varies greatly from region to region as well as between different deposits in the same region. Therefore, the end product from each natural deposit is different.  Typically limestone and dolomite are composed of calcium carbonate (CaCO3), magnesium carbonate (MgCO3), silica (SiO2), alumina (Al2O3), iron (Fe), sulphur (S) and other trace elements. These minerals are shown in Fig 1 Fig 1 Limestone and dolomite The limestone from the various deposits differs in physical chemical properties and can be classified according to their chemical composition, texture and geological formation. Limestones from different sources differ considerably in chemical compositions and physical structures. The chemical reactivity of various limestones also shows a large variation due to the difference in crystalline structure and the nature of impurities such as silica, alumina and iron etc. The varying properties of the limestone have a big influence on the processing method....