Organizational Competencies...

Organizational Competencies  Organizational competencies are the competencies needed in the organization so that it can excel and remain competitive in the market. The competencies provide an inventory of expected behaviours, skills and attitudes which lead to the successful performance of the organization. Organizational competencies depend heavily on the competencies of the employees of the organization. Organizational competencies, in the most general terms, are those ‘things’ which the employees of the organization are to demonstrate to be effective in their job, role, function, task, or duty. These ‘things’ include (i) job-relevant behaviour (what the employees say or do which result in good or poor performance), (ii) motivation (how the employees feel about a job, organization, or geographic location), and (iii) technical knowledge/skills (what the employees know/demonstrate regarding facts, technologies, their professions, procedures, jobs, and the organization, etc.). Competencies are identified through the study of jobs and roles. The term ‘competency’ is usually defined as a combination of skills, attributes and behaviours which are directly related to successful performance on the job. They are important for all the employees regardless of occupation, function, or level. An efficient organization keeps into focus the competencies on performance development/which enables its employees to align their individual performance with values and strategy while maximizing the individual performance in the pursuit of specific work-related objectives and behaviours. Organizational competencies can be broadly divided into (i) core values, (ii) technical competencies, and (iii) core competencies. Core values are the organizational values which are the shared principles and beliefs. These principles and belief unite all the organizational employees and guide them in their actions. Technical competencies are those specific competencies which are usually required to perform a given job within a job family. Technical competencies cover the various fields of expertise relevant to...

Customer Focus and Quality Organization...

Customer Focus and Quality Organization Quality organizations are those which recognize the importance of the customers. In these organizations quality normally begins and ends with customers. In these organizations all employees are one another’s customers and suppliers, who are linked in a chain that extend from within the organization to the external supplier and the external customer (Fig 1). Fig 1 Customer Supplier chain In an organization only a small percentage of employees are in direct contact with the external suppliers and external customers. However all the employees depend on the other employees to do their jobs. Hence every employee is a supplier to the employee who depends on him for the input and is a customer to the employee who supplies him with his output. In this way all the employees depend on other employees for the products or services they need to do their jobs. This simple customer supplier chain structure support various work processes in the organization and represents natural flow of work across functions and between employees within the organization. In fact, work of an employee can be seen as a process in which as a customer he receives inputs (e.g. machine parts, data etc.) from his supplier employee, add value (e.g. assembly, data processing etc.) to the inputs and then pass output (e.g. assembled part, processed data etc.) to his customer employee. Hence the prime concern of each employee should be the meeting of the requirements of his immediate customer. Alignment There should not be any conflict of interest between company’s interest and the customer’s interest. The alignment between the internal customer and the internal supplier is the matching of the capabilities of the supplier with the needs of the customer. In a quality organization, customers and suppliers work...