Iron Carbide

Iron Carbide Iron carbide is a high melting point, non-pyrophoric, strongly magnetic synthetic compound obtained in granular or powder form. It is composed of three atoms of Fe and one atom C and its chemical formula is Fe3C. The commercial iron carbide consists of around 90 % total iron and around 6 % to 6.5 % of total carbon. The primary use of the product is as a metallic charge during steelmaking for substitution of hot metal, direct reduced iron, or steel scrap. Iron carbide is an intermetallic compound of iron and carbon. It is, more precisely, intermediate transition metal carbide. Its stoichiometric composition consists of 6.67 % carbon and 93.3 % iron (Fe) by weight. It has an orthorhombic crystal structure (Fig 1). It is a hard, brittle material and normally classified as a ceramic in its pure form. It is a frequently found and important constituent in ferrous metallurgy. While iron carbide is present in most steels and cast irons, it is produced as a raw material by the iron carbide process, which belongs to the family of alternative ironmaking technologies. Fig 1 Crystal of iron carbide Iron carbide is a premium quality feed for steelmaking in electric arc furnaces and basic oxygen furnaces. It is available as dark gray granules or powder. It offers matchless metallurgical advantages and outstanding cost savings. It has a density of 7.64 kg/cu m and is thus slightly denser than the liquid iron, which has a density of 6.98 kg/cu m. The iron carbide is composed of three atoms of Fe and one atom C and is also known as cementite. Cementite is an intermetallic compound which is hard, brittle, and metastable because it tends to decompose in ferrite (or austenite) and graphite according to the reaction Fe3C = 3 Fe + C. In fact, this transformation is not...

Limestone and Lime

Limestone and Lime Limestone is an odorless white, grayish-white or tan material that ranges from sized stone to a granular powder. It is often described as the most versatile mineral. Limestone is the name given to any rock formed which consists mostly of calcium carbonate (CaCO3), but to geologists, limestone is only one of several types of carbonate rocks. These rocks are composed of more than 50 % carbonate minerals, generally containing the mineral calcite (pure CaCO3). Limestone is a sedimentary rock composed mainly of CaCO3. It is formed by the deposition either of the skeletons of small creatures and/or plants (organic limestones), or by chemical precipitation, or by deposition of fragments of limestone rock, on the beds of seas and lakes. Limestones are contaminated to a greater or lesser extent by the deposition of sand or clay which is the source of the impurities usually found in the limestone. Generally there is a difference in quality in a deposit from one layer to the next. The purest carbonates and the most suitable from the production point of view tend to be the thick bedded type. Carbonate deposits may be found in horizontal layers as deposited, or at an angle from the horizontal due to earth movements. They will vary in density, hardness and chemical purity. Limestone rocks are extremely common and make up a significant portion of the crust of the Earth. They serve as one of the largest carbon repositories on our planet. The properties of limestone make it one of the most widely used minerals. Some limestones may contain small percentage of magnesium carbonate (MgCO3). These limestones are known as dolomitic limestones. Impurities (such as clay, sand, organic remains, iron oxide, and other materials) cause limestones to show different colours, especially with weathered surfaces. Limestone may be crystalline, clastic, granular,...