Fireclay Refractory Bricks...

Fireclay Refractory Bricks  Fireclay refractory bricks are manufactured from unfired refractory bond clay and fireclays (chamotte), fired refractory clay or similar grog materials . Fireclay refractory bricks have two main components namely 18 % to 44 % of alumina (Al2O3) and  50 % to 80 % of silica (SiO2). The variety of clays and manufacturing techniques allows the production of numerous brick types appropriate to particular applications. The usefulness of fireclay refractory bricks are largely due to the presence of mineral mullite, which forms during firing and is characterized by high refractoriness and low thermal expansion. Raw materials for fireclay refractory bricks Refractory fireclay essentially consists of hydrated aluminum silicates with minor proportion of other minerals. The general formula for these aluminum silicates is Al2O3.2SiO2.2H2O, corresponding to 39.5 % alumina, 46.5 % silica, and 14 % water (H2O). Kaolinite is the most common member of this group. At high temperature, the combined water is driven off, and the residue theoretically consists of 45.9 % alumina and 54.1 % silica. However even the purest clays contain small amounts of other constituents , such as compounds of iron, calcium, magnesium, titanium, sodium, potassium, lithium, and usually some free silica. The total quantity of these fluxing agents, which lower the melting point, should be at a level of 5 % to 6 % maximum. TiO2 is not regarded as fluxing agent and was previously counted together with alumina. The name fireclay is given to a group of refractory clays which can generally withstand temperatures above pyrometric cone equivalent (PCE) value of 19. Refractoriness and plasticity are the two main properties needed in fireclay for its suitability in the manufacture of refractory bricks. A good fireclay should have a high fusion point (greater than 1580 deg C) and...

Silica Refractories

Silica Refractories Silica refractories were first produced in United Kingdom in 1822 from Ganister (caboniferous sandstone) or from so called Dinas sand. Silica occurs in a variety of crystalline modifications, e.g. quartz, tridymite, and cristobalite and also as an under-cooled melt called quartz glass. The crystalline modifications each have a high and low temperature forms which can transform reversibly. The crystal structure of the individual SiO2 modifications can differ widely, so that distinct density changes occur during transformation. This is of great importance during heating and cooling because of the change in the volume. Quartz requires the smallest volume and the quartz glass the largest. During firing above approximately 900 deg C, quartz transforms into the other modifications and melt completely at 1725 deg C. During slow cooling , reversible volume decreases take place  which are a result of the spontaneous transformation of the crystal structure from the high to the low temperature modification (Fig 1). The reversible and irreversible volume effects can cause considerable stress within the refractory brick structure. Fig 1 Calculated volume and density changes Production of silica refractories The silica refractories are manufactured as multiple asymmetric shapes, which are normally keyed or interlocked with each other by means of tongues and grooves. It is the objective of the manufacturer of silica refractory bricks to select the raw materials and the firing process in such a manner that the degree of quartz transformation is suitable for the intended application of the brick. The raw material for silica brick is naturally occurring quartzite which must meet certain requirements in order to achieve optimum brick properties. If refractoriness or thermal expansion under load (creep) are the main requirements, a quartzite of high chemical purity must be selected. Raw materials for volume stable products...