Business Process Re-engineering...

Business Process Re-engineering  Business process re-engineering (BPR) is a strategy of the management of an organization which focuses on the analysis and design of various business processes and flow of work within the organization. It seeks to help the organization radically to restructure its operations by focusing on the ground up design of the business processes. BPR helps the organization to rethink in fundamental way how it should do the work in order to drastically reduce operational costs, improve service to its customers, and become a world class organization.  It is also sometimes known as business process redesign, business transformation, or business process change management. BPR as an approach to radical organizational change is a relatively recent concept emerging from the two papers written by Davenport and Short (1990), and Hammer (1990). These papers gave rise to two popular books in 1993 written by (i) by Davenport , and (ii) by Hammer and Champy. The authors of these books promoted the idea that sometimes radical redesign and reorganization of the organization becomes necessary for lowering the costs and increasing the quality of service. The concept of BPR has become popular in a short period of time, promising amazing results very quickly in relation to corporate and technological change, transformation and competitive pressures. BPR strategy presumes that the business processes are set of logically related tasks performed to achieve defined business outcomes. Re-engineering of these processes emphasize a holistic focus on business objectives, and processes related to them are recreated totally rather than carrying out the optimization of the sub processes. The most notable definitions of BPR are given below. Hammer and Champy has defined BPR as ‘… the fundamental rethinking and radical redesign of business processes to achieve dramatic improvements in critical contemporary modern measures of performance, such as...

Five Pillars of Quality...

Five Pillars of Quality Today in an era of cut throat competition, an organization can survive only if it is a quality organization and respecting the basic concept of quality. In fact, quality is the single most important issue which an organization faces every day of its existence. A reputation for quality is essential for the future of the organization. An organization to become a business leader has to ensure that it does everything in the organization where quality work can flourish and where quality becomes a competitive advantage. Quality improvement can happen in the organization if all the employees (from top to bottom) have a shared dedication towards quality with all its functions. Organizations, which are not quality conscious, are normally product oriented. In these organizations the emphasis is on detecting errors. The responsibility of maintaining the product quality lies with the quality control department and the problem solving is normally done by a few people in the authority at the top of the pyramid. These types of organizations are successful when the environment conditions favour them. Quality conscious organizations are those which have faith in quality principles. These organizations are customer oriented and focus on preventing errors. They balance short term objectives with the long term objectives. These are the organizations which survive even in most adverse environment. Quality conscious organizations are generally supported on five pillars of quality. Three main ingredients for the five pillars in a quality conscious organization are as follows. There must be a clear understanding of what is already in place, what is working well and what can be enhanced as the pillars of quality become central to every employee’s daily work. There must be vivid sense of where the organization wants to go. Organization should have...