Employee Engagement

Employee Engagement An organization is always in the need to successfully understand and use the employees’ talents, knowledge, skills, and vigour. Employee engagement is a fundamental concept in the effort to understand and describe, both qualitatively and quantitatively, the nature of the relationship between an organization and its employees. It is a workplace approach resulting in the right conditions for all members of an organization to give their best each day, committed to their organization’s goals and values, and motivated to contribute to organizational success with an enhanced sense of their own well-being. There are four main sub-concepts within the term employee engagement. These are (i) ‘needs satisfying’ approach, in which engagement is the expression of one’s preferred self in task behaviours, (ii) ‘burnout antithesis’ approach, in which energy, involvement, efficacy are presented as the opposites of established ‘burnout’ concepts consisting of exhaustion, pessimism, and lack of accomplishment, (iii) satisfaction-engagement approach, in which engagement is a more technical version of job satisfaction, and (iv) the multi-dimensional approach, in which a clear distinction is maintained between job and organizational engagement, normally with the primary focus on antecedents and consequents to the role performance rather than the organizational identification. Employee engagement is defined by William Kahn as ‘the harnessing of organization members’ selves to their work roles; in engagement, people employ and express themselves physically, cognitively, and emotionally during role performances’. It is translating employee potential into employee performance and organizational success. It can also be defined as a set of positive attitudes and behaviours of the employees enabling their high job performance of a kind which is in tune with the organization’s mission. An engaged employee is defined as one who is fully absorbed by and enthusiastic about his work and so takes positive action to further the organization’s reputation...

Importance of Communication in the Organization...

Importance of Communication in the Organization Communication has been derived from the Latin word ‘communis’, meaning to share. It is considered to be the exchange of an information, thought and emotion between individuals of groups. It plays a fundamental role in balancing the objectives of the employees and the organization. It consists of the activity of conveying information. Hence, it requires a sender, a message, and an intended recipient, although the receiver need not be present or aware of the sender’s intent to communicate at the time of communication. Hence, communication can occur across vast distances in time and space. Communication requires that the communicating parties share an area of communicative commonality. The process of communication (Fig 1) is complete once the receiver has understood the message of the sender. Feedback is critical for effective communication between the sender and the receiver of the message. Organizational communication is one of the important segments of the communication. Fig 1 Process of communication The two most common definitions of communication are (i) communication is sending and receiving of messages by means of symbols and in that context organizational communication is a key element of organizational climate, and (ii) communication is transfer of information from sender to receiver under the condition that the receiver understands the message. Communication is a process which is transactional (i.e., it involves two or more persons interacting within an environment) and symbolic (i.e., communication transactions ‘stand for’ other things, at various levels of abstraction). An organization involves a social collectivity (or a group of persons) in which activities are coordinated in order to achieve both individual and collective goals. By coordinating activities, some degree of organizational structure is created to assist employees in dealing with each other and with others in the...

Management and Managers...

Management and Managers Management is an important part of an organization. In fact the discipline of management is developed over a period of time to its present level. On the other hand managers of tomorrow are developed from the young, educated people who are knowledge workers of today. Both the management and the managers are vital component of the organization for its smooth functioning. Present day society has become a ‘knowledge society’, a ‘society of organizations’, and a ‘networked society’. Today, the major social tasks are being performed in and through structured organizations, large and small, of all kinds and sizes. And every organization is entrusted to ‘managers’ who practice the ‘management’. History of management The word ‘management’ was first popularized by Frederick Winslow Taylor to describe what he had formerly (and more accurately) called ‘work study’ or ‘task study’ which is today being called ‘industrial engineering’. But when Taylor talked about what is being called today ‘management’ and ‘managers’, he said ‘the owners’ and ‘their representatives’. The roots of the discipline of management go back to more than 200 years. But management as a function, management as a distinct work, management as a discipline and area of study, all are the products of the twentieth century. And most people became aware of management only in 1950s. Some recent studies on management give the impression that the management is an invention of late 1940s. True, before this period interest in and study of management was confined to small groups. The popular interest in management as a discipline and a field of study is fairly recent. But management, both as a practice and as a field of study, has a respectable history, in many different countries, going back almost two centuries. When the early economists,...

Elements of Decision making...

Elements of Decision making One of the important tasks of an executive is the decision making. It generally takes a small fraction of his time. Nevertheless the decision making is a very important aspect of his work since the decisions he makes by virtue of his position, knowledge or experience have significant impact on the entire organization, its performance, and the results. Hence, executives to be effective are to make wise decisions. They are to make the decisions as a systematic process with clearly defined elements and in a distinct sequence of steps. For an effective decision making, the executive is to normally concentrate on those important and strategic decisions which have big impact for the organization. These strategic decisions need to have the highest level of conceptual understanding. The executive is required to find the constants in a situation and is to apply his skill to manipulate a great many variables arising out of the chaotic thinking in order to make an effective decision. He is to know what the decision is all about and what the underlying realities are which the decision is required to satisfy. The executive is to look out for impact rather than the technique. He is to ensure that the decision he makes needs to be sound rather than clever. An executive while making a decision is required to know whether the decision is to be based on principle or it is to be made on the merits of the case and logically. He is to be aware that the trickiest decision is the one which is between the right and the wrong compromise he has to make and he is to be able to judge one from the other. Further, the executive is to be aware that...

Organizational Competencies...

Organizational Competencies  Organizational competencies are the competencies needed in the organization so that it can excel and remain competitive in the market. The competencies provide an inventory of expected behaviours, skills and attitudes which lead to the successful performance of the organization. Organizational competencies depend heavily on the competencies of the employees of the organization. Organizational competencies, in the most general terms, are those ‘things’ which the employees of the organization are to demonstrate to be effective in their job, role, function, task, or duty. These ‘things’ include (i) job-relevant behaviour (what the employees say or do which result in good or poor performance), (ii) motivation (how the employees feel about a job, organization, or geographic location), and (iii) technical knowledge/skills (what the employees know/demonstrate regarding facts, technologies, their professions, procedures, jobs, and the organization, etc.). Competencies are identified through the study of jobs and roles. The term ‘competency’ is usually defined as a combination of skills, attributes and behaviours which are directly related to successful performance on the job. They are important for all the employees regardless of occupation, function, or level. An efficient organization keeps into focus the competencies on performance development/which enables its employees to align their individual performance with values and strategy while maximizing the individual performance in the pursuit of specific work-related objectives and behaviours. Organizational competencies can be broadly divided into (i) core values, (ii) technical competencies, and (iii) core competencies. Core values are the organizational values which are the shared principles and beliefs. These principles and belief unite all the organizational employees and guide them in their actions. Technical competencies are those specific competencies which are usually required to perform a given job within a job family. Technical competencies cover the various fields of expertise relevant to...