Production of Ferro-Silicon Jun27

Production of Ferro-Silicon...

Production of Ferro-Silicon Ferro-silicon (Fe-Si) is a ferro-alloy having iron (Fe) and silicon (Si) as its main elements. The ferro-alloy normally contains Si in the range of 15 % to 90 %. The usual Si contents in the Fe-Si available in the market are 15 %, 45 %, 65 %, 75 %, and 90 %. The remainder is Fe, with around 2 % of other elements like aluminum (Al) and calcium (Ca). Fe-Si is produced industrially by carbo-thermic reduction of silicon dioxide (SiO2) with carbon (C) in the presence of iron ore, scrap iron, mill scale, or other source of iron. The smelting of Fe-Si is a continuous process carried out in the electric submerged arc furnace (SAF) with the self-baking electrodes. Fe-Si (typical qualities 65%, 75% and 90% silicon) is mainly used during steelmaking and in foundries for the production of C steels, stainless steels as a deoxidizing agent and for the alloying of steel and cast iron. It is also used for the production of silicon steel also called electrical steel. During the production of cast iron, Fe-Si is also used for inoculation of the iron to accelerate graphitization. In arc welding Fe-Si can be found in some electrode coatings. The ideal reduction reaction during the production of Fe-Si silicon is SiO2+2C=Si+2CO. However the real reaction is quite complex due to the different temperature zones inside the SAF. The gas in the hottest zone has a high content of silicon mono oxide (SiO) which is required to be recovered in the outer charge layers if the recovery of Si is to be high. The recovery reactions occur in the outer charge layers where they heat the charge to a very high temperature. The outlet gas form the furnace contains SiO2 which can...

Production of Silico-Manganese in a Submerged Arc Furnace Jun09

Production of Silico-Manganese in a Submerged Arc Furnace...

Production of Silico-Manganese in a Submerged Arc Furnace Silico-manganese (Si-Mn) is an alloy used for adding both silicon (Si) and manganese (Mn) to liquid steel during steelmaking at low carbon (C) content. A standard Si-Mn alloy contains 65 % to 70 % Mn, 15 % to 20 % Si and 1.5 % to 2 % C. Si-Mn alloy grades are medium carbon (MC) and low carbon (LC). The steelmaking industry is the only consumer of this alloy. Use of Si-Mn during steelmaking in place of a mix of high carbon ferro-manganese (Fe-Mn) alloy and ferro-silicon (Fe-Si) alloy is driven by economic considerations. Both Mn and Si are crucial constituents in steelmaking. They are used as deoxidizers, desulphurizers and alloying elements. Si is the primary deoxidizer. Mn is a milder deoxidizer than Si but enhances the effectiveness due to the formation of stable manganese silicates and aluminates. It also serves as desulphurizer. Manganese is used as an alloying element in almost all types of steel. Of particular interest is its modifying effect on the iron-carbon (Fe-C) system by increasing the hardenability of the steel. Si-Mn is produced by carbo-thermic reduction of oxidic raw materials in a three-phase, alternating current (AC), submerged arc furnace (SAF) which is also being used for the production of Fe-Mn. Operation of the process for the Si-Mn production is often more difficult than the Fe-Mn production process since higher process temperature is needed. The common sizes of the SAF used for the production of Si-Mn are normally in the range 9 MVA to 40 MVA producing 45 tons to 220 tons of Si-Mn per day. In the carbo-thermic reduction of oxidic raw materials, heat is just as essential for reduction as C is, due to the endothermic reduction reactions and a...

Evolution of Blast Furnace Iron Making Jan10

Evolution of Blast Furnace Iron Making...

Evolution of Blast Furnace Iron Making The origin of the first smelting of iron is concealed in the unrecorded history of human civilization. The first evidence of iron implements being used in ancient times actually comes from Egypt where an iron tool was found in a joint between two stones in a pyramid. The origin of many prehistoric iron implements was probably meteoric iron. Meteoric iron contains 5 % to 26 % nickel (Ni) while smelted iron contains only traces of Ni and hence iron artifacts made from meteors can be differentiated from objects of smelted iron. More than 4,000 years ago, people discovered meteoric iron. But it was another 2,000 years before the production of iron from mined iron ore began. The earliest finds of smelted iron in India date back to 1800 BCE (Before Common Era).  The smelting of iron is said to have taken place among the Calybes of Armenia, subjects of the Hittite Empire, at about 1500 BCE. When their empire collapsed around 1200 BCE, the various tribes took the knowledge of iron making with them, spreading it across Europe and Asia. The knowledge of ironworking in all of Europe and Western Asia is ultimately traced to this source. The Iron Age began with the discovery of smelting of iron. Beginning of iron smelting As with the reduction of cop­per sulfide ores, the first reduction of iron oxide was probably accidental. It was the powers of observation that led these ancient metallurgists (who were the miners, chemists, and technologists of their day) to realize that iron could be produced in simple furnaces by direct carbon (C) reduction of the oxide ore. The first recorded depiction of a smelting process was found on the wall of an Egyptian tomb dating to...

Selection of Coal for inclusion in Coal Blend in Coke Making Sep26

Selection of Coal for inclusion in Coal Blend in Coke Making...

Selection of Coal for inclusion in Coal Blend in Coke Making Blending of coals is necessary from economical point of view by reducing the percentage of high cost, prime or hard coking coals and replacing it with medium or soft coking coals. In some coke oven plants even a small percentage of non-coking or steam coals have also been used in the blend. Selection of a proper coal blend for use in by product coke ovens is always a big challenge for the coke producer since the blend has to meet the following requirements. It is to meet the requirement of crushing during coal preparation. All the components of the coals are neither be over crushed or under crushed. The sized coal blend for charging the coke ovens is to meet the requirements of density, flow, and the size fractions. It is to have necessary coking and caking properties for producing coke of quality which meets the quality requirements of blast furnace (BF) coke. The three basic quality requirements of BF coke are (i) to provide heat for the endothermic reactions taking place in the blast furnace, (ii) to act as a reducing agent by producing the necessary reduction gases, and (iii) to provide a permeable support in the BF for the iron bearing burden. It is to provide safe pushing performance in coke ovens. It must not put excessive pressure on coke oven walls during the process of coking and damage them. It should meet the yield requirements not only of BF coke but also of coke oven gas. A proper coal blend will not produce excessive nut coke and coke breeze. It is to be economical. In view of the above varied types of requirements, the decisions regarding coal blends are not...

Types of Energy used in a Steel Plants and Energy Conservation...

Types of Energy used in a Steel Plants and Energy Conservation Energy is needed to do any work. Energy can be in the form of potential energy or it can be in the form kinetic energy. Potential energy is stored energy and for doing the work it is to be released from the storage.  Common example of potential energy are fuel energy, chemical energy and  pressure energy etc. Kinetic energy is energy due to motion and example of kinetic energy is electric energy which is the movement of electrons. Energy conservation activities are the efforts made towards reduction in energy consumption for doing a work. These efforts can be in the form of reduction of energy wastages, recovery and recycling of waste energy, and/or by improving the energy efficiency of the processes. Various forms of energy used in an integrated steel plant are described below.  Fuel energy Fuel energy is the potential energy which constitutes the major component of all the form of energies used in the steel plant. Fuel energy is used in the form of primary fuels and the byproduct fuels. Primary fuels used in steel plant are (i) solid fuels, (ii) liquid fuels, and (iii) gaseous fuels. Byproduct fuels are mainly coke oven gas recovered during coking process of metallurgical coals, blast furnace gas recovered from blast furnace during the production of hot metal, converter gas recovered during the production of steel in the basic oxygen furnace process, and coal tar fuel produced during the cleaning of the raw coke oven gas produced while coking of the metallurgical coals. Solid fuels used in the steel plant are coal and/or coke. Solid fuels constitute the highest percentage of energy consumed in steel plant. Both metallurgical (coking) coals and non coking coals are...