Coking Pressure Phenomena and its Influencing Factors Dec17

Coking Pressure Phenomena and its Influencing Factors...

Coking Pressure Phenomena and its Influencing Factors Coking pressure is a phenomenon which has become important because of the use of the double-heated wall, vertical, slot-type coke ovens. In the round beehive ovens as well in the heat recovery coke ovens, which are also being used for coke production, the coal can freely expand upwards and thus the swelling of the charge is accommodated by this free expansion. On the other hand, in the slot-type coke ovens, the expansion of the coal horizontally to the heated wall is restricted. There are several cases of premature failure of oven walls during the coal carbonization process. The erection of the new, larger and taller coke ovens has been accompanied by undesirable occurrences of distorted walls due to the coking pressure resulting in several studies regarding the expansion behaviour of coal during carbonization. The efforts have been focused on developing a reliable test so that coal blends can be tested for safety prior to their use in the coke ovens. Development of coking pressure During carbonization process, coal passes through the plastic stage and volatile matter (VM) evolves during and, to a lesser extent, after that stage. It is normally accepted that coking pressure arises in the plastic stage. In a coke oven chamber, two vertical plastic layers parallel to the heating walls are formed from the beginning of carbonization. As the carbonization proceeds these layers move towards the centre of the oven. At the same time, similar horizontal layers are formed at the top and bottom of the charge. These are joined with the two vertical layers and the whole forms a continuous region that surrounds the uncarbonized coal and it is usually referred to as the ‘plastic envelope’. The permeability of the plastic layers is...

Properties and Structure of Metallurgical Coke...

Properties and Structure of Metallurgical Coke Metallurgical coke is a porous, fissured, silver-black solid and is an important part of the ironmaking process since it provides the carbon (C) and heat required to chemically reduce iron burden in the blast furnace (BF) to produce hot metal (HM). It is a porous C material with high strength produced by carbonization of coals of specific rank or of coal blends at temperatures around 1100 deg C in coke ovens. It is composed of both the organic and inorganic matter. C is the major component of the organic part. Small amounts of sulphur (S), nitrogen (N2), hydrogen (H2) and oxygen (O2) also occur in the organic part. The inorganic matter in coke is called coke ash (mineral matter) and is typically around 12 % on dry basis. Both the organic and inorganic components influence coke reactivity. Thus, coke characterization is an important aspect to understand the quality of coke formed. The basic understanding of coke quality is an important task as it determines the high temperature and gasification behaviours of coke in the blast furnace (BF). As the coke moves towards the lower zones of BF, it degrades and generates fines, which affects the bed permeability and the process efficiency. Hence, superior coke quality is critical for a stable and efficient BF operation. Coke quality is influenced by many factors such as the rank, the maceral composition (leading to isotropic or anisotropic coke structures), the ash composition and the fluidity of the starting coals, the carbonization conditions including peak temperature, heating rate, particle size, pressure and bulk density as well as heat treatment conditions. The important properties of coke, including mechanical strength and reactivity, are governed by the arrangement of the constituent C atoms. The principal features...

Coal Carbonization for Coke Production Dec08

Coal Carbonization for Coke Production...

Coal Carbonization for Coke Production Coal carbonization is the process by which coal is heated and volatile products (liquid and gaseous) are driven off, leaving a solid residue called coke. Carbonization of coal involves heating coal to high temperatures either in the absence of oxygen (O2) or in control quantity of O2. A gaseous by-product referred to as coke oven gas (COG) along with ammonia (NH3), water, and sulphur compounds are also thermally removed from the coal. The coke which remains after this distillation largely consists of carbon (C), in various crystallographic forms, but also contains the thermally modified remains of various minerals which have been in the original coal. These mineral remains, usually referred to as coke ash, do not burn and are left as a residue after the coke is burned. Until recently, the carbonization of coal was considered as ‘destructive distillation’, but with the increased importance of the products of carbonization, this phrase is falling out of use. Now, the coal carbonization is considered to be a physico-chemical process which depends on the coking rate, operating parameters, coal blend properties and the transport of thermal energy. The heating rate of coal influences the strength and the fissuring properties of coke. In order to arrive at a homogeneous quality, the heating of the coal cake in a coke oven is therefore to be uniform over the total length and height of the oven. In addition to this, the plastic layer migration rate influences the level of thermal stress in the re-solidified mass and therefore, the level of fissuring. The coal carbonization process started at the beginning of the 18th century by carbonizing good quality of coking coal in heaps on the ground, which subsequently led to the development of beehive ovens of...

Coal for Pulverized Coal Injection in Blast Furnace...

Coal for Pulverized Coal Injection in Blast Furnace Injection of pulverized coal in the blast furnace (BF) was initially driven by high oil prices but now the use of pulverized coal injection (PCI) has  become a standard practice in the operation of a BF since it satisfy the requirement of reducing raw material costs, pollution and also satisfy the need to extend the life of ageing coke ovens. The injection of the pulverized coal into the BF results into (i) increase in the productivity of the BF, i.e. the amount of hot metal (HM) produced per day by the BF, (ii) reduce the consumption of the more expensive coking coals by replacing coke with cheaper soft coking or thermal coals, (iii) assist in maintaining furnace stability, (iv) improve the consistency of the quality of the HM and reduce its silicon (Si) content, and (v) reduce greenhouse gas emissions. In addition to these advantages, use of the PCI in the BF has proved to be a powerful tool in the hands of the furnace operator to adjust the thermal condition of the furnace much faster than what is possible by adjusting the burden charge from the top. Schematic diagram of a BF tuyere showing a pulverized coal injection lance is at Fig 1. Fig 1 Schematic diagram of a BF tuyere showing a pulverized coal injection lance Several types of coals are being used for PCI in the BF. In principle, all types of coals can be used for injection in BF, but coking coals are not used for injection since they are costly, have lower availability and are needed for the production of coke. Also, if coking coals are used for injections in BF, They lead to tuyere coking. Hence, coals used for injection...

Anthracite Coal

Anthracite Coal Anthracite coal derives its name from the Greek word ‘anthrakít?s’, literally meaning ‘coal-like’.  It is frequently being referred as hard coal and is one of the four types of coals. Other types of coals are lignite coal, sub- bituminous coal and bituminous coal. Since anthracite coal had been subjected to the intense pressure and heat, it is the most compressed and hardest coal available. Being a hard coal, it contains greater potential to produce heat energy than softer, geologically ‘newer’ coal. As per ISO 11760:2005, anthracite coal is defined as the coal, synonymous with high-rank coal, having a mean random vitrinite reflectance, equal to or greater than 2.0 % but less than 6.0 %, or, preferably, a mean maximum reflectance, , less than 8.0 % for geologically unaltered coal. Geology and mining of anthracite coal Anthracite coal was formed from bituminous coal when great pressures had developed in the folded rock. Transformation of the bituminous coal into anthracite is called ‘Anthracitization’. It was formed during the Carboniferous Age, when the dense green vegetation that thrived during the tropical climate of the time fossilized. It is the oldest and cleanest type of coal. It is the rarest and most mature coal. It is a hard, compact variety of coal. It has the highest ranking amongst all the four types of coals. It has undergone the most metamorphosis. It has the highest fixed carbon content and the least impurities. It has the highest energy density amongst all types of coal. The formation of anthracite coal is shown in Fig 1. Fig 1 Formation of anthracite coal Anthracite coal normally occurs in old geological formations which have spent the longest time underground. It is the rarest and most mature coal which accounts for only around 1 % of the world’s total coal reserves. The major reserves of the anthracite coal are...