Production of Ferro-Silicon Jun27

Production of Ferro-Silicon...

Production of Ferro-Silicon Ferro-silicon (Fe-Si) is a ferro-alloy having iron (Fe) and silicon (Si) as its main elements. The ferro-alloy normally contains Si in the range of 15 % to 90 %. The usual Si contents in the Fe-Si available in the market are 15 %, 45 %, 65 %, 75 %, and 90 %. The remainder is Fe, with around 2 % of other elements like aluminum (Al) and calcium (Ca). Fe-Si is produced industrially by carbo-thermic reduction of silicon dioxide (SiO2) with carbon (C) in the presence of iron ore, scrap iron, mill scale, or other source of iron. The smelting of Fe-Si is a continuous process carried out in the electric submerged arc furnace (SAF) with the self-baking electrodes. Fe-Si (typical qualities 65%, 75% and 90% silicon) is mainly used during steelmaking and in foundries for the production of C steels, stainless steels as a deoxidizing agent and for the alloying of steel and cast iron. It is also used for the production of silicon steel also called electrical steel. During the production of cast iron, Fe-Si is also used for inoculation of the iron to accelerate graphitization. In arc welding Fe-Si can be found in some electrode coatings. The ideal reduction reaction during the production of Fe-Si silicon is SiO2+2C=Si+2CO. However the real reaction is quite complex due to the different temperature zones inside the SAF. The gas in the hottest zone has a high content of silicon mono oxide (SiO) which is required to be recovered in the outer charge layers if the recovery of Si is to be high. The recovery reactions occur in the outer charge layers where they heat the charge to a very high temperature. The outlet gas form the furnace contains SiO2 which can...

Production of Silico-Manganese in a Submerged Arc Furnace Jun09

Production of Silico-Manganese in a Submerged Arc Furnace...

Production of Silico-Manganese in a Submerged Arc Furnace Silico-manganese (Si-Mn) is an alloy used for adding both silicon (Si) and manganese (Mn) to liquid steel during steelmaking at low carbon (C) content. A standard Si-Mn alloy contains 65 % to 70 % Mn, 15 % to 20 % Si and 1.5 % to 2 % C. Si-Mn alloy grades are medium carbon (MC) and low carbon (LC). The steelmaking industry is the only consumer of this alloy. Use of Si-Mn during steelmaking in place of a mix of high carbon ferro-manganese (Fe-Mn) alloy and ferro-silicon (Fe-Si) alloy is driven by economic considerations. Both Mn and Si are crucial constituents in steelmaking. They are used as deoxidizers, desulphurizers and alloying elements. Si is the primary deoxidizer. Mn is a milder deoxidizer than Si but enhances the effectiveness due to the formation of stable manganese silicates and aluminates. It also serves as desulphurizer. Manganese is used as an alloying element in almost all types of steel. Of particular interest is its modifying effect on the iron-carbon (Fe-C) system by increasing the hardenability of the steel. Si-Mn is produced by carbo-thermic reduction of oxidic raw materials in a three-phase, alternating current (AC), submerged arc furnace (SAF) which is also being used for the production of Fe-Mn. Operation of the process for the Si-Mn production is often more difficult than the Fe-Mn production process since higher process temperature is needed. The common sizes of the SAF used for the production of Si-Mn are normally in the range 9 MVA to 40 MVA producing 45 tons to 220 tons of Si-Mn per day. In the carbo-thermic reduction of oxidic raw materials, heat is just as essential for reduction as C is, due to the endothermic reduction reactions and a...

Tecnored Process for Ironmaking Apr30

Tecnored Process for Ironmaking...

Tecnored Process for Ironmaking Tecnored process was developed by ‘Tecnored Desenvolvimento Tecnológico S.A.’ of Brazil and is based upon a low pressure moving bed reduction furnace which reduces cold bonded, carbon bearing, self-fluxing, and self-reducing pellets. Reduction is carried out in a short height shaft furnace of distinct design at typical reduction temperatures. The process produces hot metal (liquid iron). Tecnored technology has been conceived and developed to be a ‘coke-less’ ironmaking process, thus avoiding the investment and operation of environmentally harmful  coke ovens besides significantly reducing green-house gas emissions in the production of hot metal. Tecnored process uses a combination of hot and cold blast and requires no additional oxygen. It eliminates the need for coke plants, sinter plants, and tonnage oxygen plants. Hence, the process has much lower operating and investment costs than those of traditional ironmaking routes. Tecnored process is flexible with regard to the type of iron bearing and carbon bearing raw materials which it can process. The ability of the process to smelt either pellets or briquettes, or even mixed charges of both, provides means of using a wide range of alternative feed materials. The process has got good productivity and high energy efficiency. Tecnored process is also being claimed to be suitable for producing ferro alloys such as ferro manganese. History of development The history of the development of the Tecnored process comprises different phases with different goals, testing a wide range of raw materials and using distinct sizes and concepts of the reactor. During the period 1979 to 1985, development activities were carried out regarding the use of pyrite cinder containing self-reducing pellets as metallic burden in cupola furnaces. This concept of self-reduction was adapted to develop the new process.  In 1985 the concept of the Tecnored...

Non Coking Coal for Iron Production...

Non Coking Coal for Iron Production A non-coking coal is that coal which when heated in the absence of air leaves a coherent residue. This residue does not possess the physical and chemical properties of the coke and is not suitable for the manufacture of coke. Non coking coal like any other coal is an organic rock (as opposed to most other rocks in the earth’s crust, such as clays and sandstone, which are inorganic). It contains mostly carbon (C), but it also has hydrogen (H2), oxygen (O2), sulphur (S) and nitrogen (N2), as well as some inorganic constituents which are known as ash (minerals) and water (H2O). Coal was formed from prehistoric plants, in marshy environments, some tens or hundreds of millions of years ago. The presence of water restricted the supply of oxygen and allowed thermal and bacterial decomposition of plant material to take place, instead of the completion of the carbon cycle. Under these conditions of anaerobic decay, in the so-called biochemical stage of coal formation, a carbon-rich material called ‘peat’ was formed. In the subsequent geochemical stage, the different time-temperature histories led to the formations of coal of widely differing properties. These formations of coal are lignite (65 % to 72 % carbon), sub-bituminous coal (72 % to 76 % carbon), bituminous coal (76 % to 90 % carbon), and anthracite (90 % to 95 %) carbon. The degree of change undergone by a coal as it matures from peat to anthracite is known as coalification. Coalification has an important bearing on the physical and chemical properties of coal and is referred to as the ‘rank’ of the coal. Ranking is determined by the degree of transformation of the original plant material to carbon. The ranks of coals, from those with...

Selection of Coal for inclusion in Coal Blend in Coke Making Sep26

Selection of Coal for inclusion in Coal Blend in Coke Making...

Selection of Coal for inclusion in Coal Blend in Coke Making Blending of coals is necessary from economical point of view by reducing the percentage of high cost, prime or hard coking coals and replacing it with medium or soft coking coals. In some coke oven plants even a small percentage of non-coking or steam coals have also been used in the blend. Selection of a proper coal blend for use in by product coke ovens is always a big challenge for the coke producer since the blend has to meet the following requirements. It is to meet the requirement of crushing during coal preparation. All the components of the coals are neither be over crushed or under crushed. The sized coal blend for charging the coke ovens is to meet the requirements of density, flow, and the size fractions. It is to have necessary coking and caking properties for producing coke of quality which meets the quality requirements of blast furnace (BF) coke. The three basic quality requirements of BF coke are (i) to provide heat for the endothermic reactions taking place in the blast furnace, (ii) to act as a reducing agent by producing the necessary reduction gases, and (iii) to provide a permeable support in the BF for the iron bearing burden. It is to provide safe pushing performance in coke ovens. It must not put excessive pressure on coke oven walls during the process of coking and damage them. It should meet the yield requirements not only of BF coke but also of coke oven gas. A proper coal blend will not produce excessive nut coke and coke breeze. It is to be economical. In view of the above varied types of requirements, the decisions regarding coal blends are not...