Bituminous coal

Bituminous coal Bituminous coal is an organic sedimentary rock formed by diagenetic and sub metamorphic compression of peat bog material. It is also called as black coal. It is often referred to as soft coal. However, this designation is a layman’s term and has little to do with the hardness of the rock. Bituminous coal is by far the largest group and is characterized as having lower fixed carbon (C) and higher volatile matter than anthracite coals. It is the type of coal which is most widely used in the world today. Bituminous coal is the second highest quality of coal (below anthracite) and the most abundant type. Usually, bituminous coal comes from fairly old coal deposits (around 300 million years old).The energy density of this coal is relatively high, therefore, releases a significant amount of energy when burned. Bituminous coal is defined as a medium?rank coal with either a gross calorific value (CV) on a moist, ash?free basis of not less than 24 mega joules per kilogram (MJ/kg) and with a Vitrinite mean Random Reflectance less than 2.0 %, or with a gross CV on a moist, ash?free basis of less than 24 MJ/kg provided that the Vitrinite mean random reflectance is equal to, or greater than 0.6 %. Bituminous coals are agglomerating and have a higher volatile matter (VM) and lower C content than anthracite coal. This coal is originated by coalification of plant matter deposited in sequences dominated by clastic sediments under diagenetic conditions (thermal and pressure mode) of a given coal basin. Coalification proceeded under geologic time scale. In various coal basins (coal seams) coal matter differs in regard of different primary composition of plant matter and sedimentary environment. Composition of coal (e.g. elemental composition, VM etc.) and mean reflectance of vitrinite reflect final stage of coal metamorphism of a given sedimentary basin. Bituminous...

Anthracite Coal

Anthracite Coal Anthracite coal derives its name from the Greek word ‘anthrakít?s’, literally meaning ‘coal-like’.  It is frequently being referred as hard coal and is one of the four types of coals. Other types of coals are lignite coal, sub- bituminous coal and bituminous coal. Since anthracite coal had been subjected to the intense pressure and heat, it is the most compressed and hardest coal available. Being a hard coal, it contains greater potential to produce heat energy than softer, geologically ‘newer’ coal. As per ISO 11760:2005, anthracite coal is defined as the coal, synonymous with high-rank coal, having a mean random vitrinite reflectance, equal to or greater than 2.0 % but less than 6.0 %, or, preferably, a mean maximum reflectance, , less than 8.0 % for geologically unaltered coal. Geology and mining of anthracite coal Anthracite coal was formed from bituminous coal when great pressures had developed in the folded rock. Transformation of the bituminous coal into anthracite is called ‘Anthracitization’. It was formed during the Carboniferous Age, when the dense green vegetation that thrived during the tropical climate of the time fossilized. It is the oldest and cleanest type of coal. It is the rarest and most mature coal. It is a hard, compact variety of coal. It has the highest ranking amongst all the four types of coals. It has undergone the most metamorphosis. It has the highest fixed carbon content and the least impurities. It has the highest energy density amongst all types of coal. The formation of anthracite coal is shown in Fig 1. Fig 1 Formation of anthracite coal Anthracite coal normally occurs in old geological formations which have spent the longest time underground. It is the rarest and most mature coal which accounts for only around 1 % of the world’s total coal reserves. The major reserves of the anthracite coal are...