Wire and Rod Drawing Process for Steel Nov13

Wire and Rod Drawing Process for Steel...

Wire and Rod Drawing Process for Steel Drawing of wire from steel rod is a metal working process used for the reduction of the cross-section of the rod. Similarly rods are drawn from steel rounds of larger diameters. During drawing the volume remains the same and hence there is increased in the length of the drawn wire or rod. It is carried out by pulling the wire/rod through a single or a series of the drawing dies. In the case of series of drawing dies, the subsequent drawing die is to have smaller bore diameter than the previous drawing die. Drawing is usually performed in round sections at room temperature, thus it is classified as a cold working process. However, it can be performed at higher temperatures for large wires to reduce forces. Drawing process normally is most frequently used to produce round cross sections, but squares and other shapes can also be drawn. Wire/rod drawing is an important industrial process, providing commercial products. Rod and wire products cover a very wide range of applications which include shafts for power transmission, machine and structural components, blanks for bolts and rivets, electrical wiring, cables, wire stock for fences, rod stock to produce nails, screws, rivets, springs and many others. Drawing of rods from steel rounds is used to produce rods for machining, forging, and other processes etc. Advantages of drawing in the above applications include (i) close dimensional control, (ii) good surface finish, (iii) improved mechanical properties such as strength and hardness, and (iv) adaptability to economical batch or mass production. In the process of drawing, the cross section of a long rod or wire is reduced or changed by pulling (hence the term drawing) it through a die called a draw die. Pulling of rod...

Steels and Cast irons and their Essential and Incidental Elements...

Steels and Cast irons and their Essential and Incidental Elements Steels and cast irons are basically alloys of iron and different other elements in the periodic table. The vast majority of steels and all cast irons contain carbon as a principal alloying element. As a general definition, steel is an alloy of iron, carbon (less than 2 % C), and other alloying elements which is capable of being hot and/or cold deformed into various shapes. On the other hand, cast iron is an alloy of iron, carbon (higher than 2 % C), and other alloying elements and is not generally capable of being hot and/or cold deformed. A cast iron is used in its cast form. Steels and cast irons are the most widely used and least expensive metallic materials. There are several thousands of different steel compositions presently available. A vast variety of terminology is used to differentiate different types of steels. In fact, the way the steels are classified sometimes is quite confusing even to the regular user of steels. However, in many cases, the steels fall into a limited number of well-defined classes. Generally, the carbon and low alloy steels come under a classification system based on composition. The high alloy steels (the stainless, heat resistant, and wear resistant steels, etc.) are being classified according to many different systems, including composition, microstructure, application, or specification. The easiest way to classify steels is by their chemical composition. Different alloying elements are normally added to iron for the purpose of attaining certain specific properties and characteristics. These elements include, but are not limited to, carbon, manganese, silicon, nickel, chromium, molybdenum, vanadium, niobium, copper, aluminum, titanium, tungsten, and cobalt. The general category of carbon and low alloy steels encompasses plain carbon steels, alloy steels,...

Corrosion of Cast Steels...

Corrosion of Cast Steels Cast steels are generally classified into the categories of (i) carbon (C) steels, (ii) low alloy steels, (iii) corrosion resistant steels, and (iv) heat resistant steels, depending on the alloy content and the planned usage. Steel castings are categorized as corrosion resistant if they are capable of sustained operation when exposed to attack by corrosive agents at operating temperatures which are generally below 300 deg C. The high alloy iron base compositions are generally given the name ‘stainless steels’, though this name is not recognized universally. Actually, these steels are widely referred to as cast stainless steels. Some of the high alloy steels (e.g. 12 % chromium steel) show many of the familiar physical characteristics of C steels and low alloy steels, and some of their mechanical properties, such as hardness and tensile strength (TS), can be altered by suitable heat treatment. The alloy steels of higher chromium (Cr) content (20 % to 30 % Cr), Cr-Ni (nickel)  steels and Ni-Cr steels do not show the changes in phase observed in ordinary C steel when heated or cooled in the range from room temperature to the melting point. Consequently, these steels are non hardenable, and their mechanical properties depend on the composition instead of heat treatment. The high alloy steels (stainless steels) differ from C steels and low alloy steels in other respects, such as their production and properties. Special attention is required to be given to each grade with regard to casting design and casting practice in the foundry. For example, such elements as Cr, Ni, C, N2 (nitrogen), Si (silicon), Mo (molybdenum), and Nb (niobium) can exert a deep impact on the ultimate structure of these complex steels. Hence, balancing of the alloy compositions is normally required to...

Corrosion of Stainless Steels...

Corrosion of Stainless Steels Stainless steels (SS) are alloys of iron (Fe) which containing a minimum of 10.5 % chromium (Cr). With increasing content of Cr and with the presence or absence of many of other elements, SS can provide an extraordinary range of corrosion resistance. Different grades of SS are being used since several years in atmospheres which are mild (open air, in architectural applications) as well as extremely severe (chemical-processing industries). Stainless steels are classified in five families as per the crystal structures and the strengthening precipitates. Each family of SS shows its own general features in terms of mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. Within each family, there is a range of specifications which varies in composition, corrosion resistance, and cost. Stainless steels are vulnerable to several types of localized corrosive attack. The avoidance of such localized corrosion is the focus of most of the efforts made in the selection of SS. Also, the corrosion performance of SS is strongly influenced by practices of design, fabrication, surface conditioning, and maintenance. The selection of a grade of SS for a specific application involves the consideration of several factors, but the main factor remains corrosion resistance. It is the first necessity to specify the likely service environment. Besides considering the design conditions, it is also necessary to consider the reasonably anticipated exposures or upsets in service conditions. The suitability of a specific specification can be assessed from laboratory tests or from the documented field experience in similar atmospheres. Once the specification with satisfactory corrosion resistance has been identified, it is then appropriate to consider other factors such as mechanical properties, ease of fabrication, the types and degree of risk present in the application, the availability of the necessary product forms, and cost. Families of...

Corrosion of Carbon Steels...

Corrosion of Carbon Steels Carbon (C) steel is the most widely used engineering material. Despite its relatively limited corrosion resistance, C steels are used in large tonnages in marine applications, power plants (both nuclear based power and fossil fuel based power), metal processing equipment, power transmission, transportation, chemical processing, petroleum production and refining, pipelines, mining, and construction etc. The annual cost of metallic corrosion to the total economy of a country is very high. Because C steels represent the largest single class of alloys in use, both in terms of tonnage and total cost, it is easy to understand that the corrosion of C steels is a problem of enormous practical importance. This, of course, is the reason for the existence of entire industries devoted to providing protective systems for iron and steel. Because of corrosion, the design aspects are also very important. Indeed, design changes are often the most efficient manner of dealing with a particular corrosion problem. C steels also often called mild steels have limited alloy content, usually less than 2 % of the total of all the additions. These levels of additions do not generally produce any remarkable changes in general corrosion behaviour. One possible exception to this statement is the weathering steels, in which small additions of copper (Cu), chromium (Cr), nickel (Ni), and/or phosphorus (P) produce significant reductions in corrosion rate in certain environments. At the levels present in the C steels, the usual impurities have no significant effect on corrosion rate in the atmosphere, neutral waters, or soils. Only in the case of acid attack is an effect observed. In this latter case, the presence of P and sulphur (S) markedly increase the rate of attack. Indeed, in acid systems, the pure irons appear to show the...