Top Gas Recycling Blast Furnace Process Mar09

Top Gas Recycling Blast Furnace Process...

Top Gas Recycling Blast Furnace Process In the area of production of hot metal (HM) by blast furnace (BF), the most promising technology to significantly reduce the CO2 (carbon di-oxide) emission is recycling of CO (carbon mono oxide) and H2 (hydrogen) from the gas leaving the BF top. CO and H2 content of the top BF gas has a potential to act as reducing gas elements, and hence their recirculation to the BF is considered as an effective alternative to improve the BF performance, enhance the utilization of C (carbon) and H2, and reduce the emission of CO2. This ‘top gas recycling’ (TGR) technology is mainly based on lowering the usage of fossil C (coke and coal) with the re-usage of the reducing agents (CO and H2), after the removal of the CO2 from the top BF gas. This leads to lower the energy requirements. Because of the advantages of high productivity, high PCI (pulverized coal injection) rate, low fuel rate, and low CO2 emission etc., the TGR-BF process is considered to be one of the promising ironmaking processes in future. In TGR-BF, oxygen (O2) is blown into the BF instead of hot air to eliminate nitrogen (N2) in the top BF gas. Part of the top BF gas containing CO and H2 is utilized again as the reducing agent in the BF. CO2 from the BF top gas is captured and then stored. Several recycling processes have been suggested, evaluated or practically applied for different objectives. These processes are distinguished by (i) with or without CO2 removal, (ii) with or without preheating, and (iii) the position of injection. The concept of the TGR-BF (Fig 1) involves many technologies which include (i) injection of reducing top BF gas components CO and H2 in the...

Ironmaking by Blast Furnace and Carbon di Oxide Emissions Jan14

Ironmaking by Blast Furnace and Carbon di Oxide Emissions...

Ironmaking by Blast Furnace and Carbon di Oxide Emissions It is widely recognised that carbon di-oxide (CO2) in the atmosphere is the main component influencing global warming through the green-house effect. Since 1896 the concentration of CO2 in the atmosphere has increased by 25 %. The iron and steel industry is known as an energy intensive industry and as a significant emitter of CO2. Hence, climate change is identified by the iron and steel industry as a major environmental challenge. Long before the findings of the Inter-governmental Panel on Climate Change in 2007, major producers of iron and steel recognized that long term solutions are needed to tackle the CO2 emissions from the iron and steel industry. Therefore, the iron and steel industry has been highly proactive in improving energy consumption and reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. In the present environment of the climate change, within the iron and steel industry, there is a constant drive to reduce energy costs, reduce emissions and ensure maximum waste energy re-use. In the traditional processes for producing iron and steel, emission of CO2 is inevitable, especially for the blast furnace (BF) process, which requires carbon (C) as a fuel and reducing agent to convert iron oxide to the metallic state, and hence is the main process for the generation of CO2 in an integrated iron and steel plant. Climate policy is in fact, an important driver for further development of the ironmaking technology by BF. Critically, amongst the challenges facing the BF operation is decarbonization. Significant steps have been made by the iron and steel industry to increase the thermal efficiency of the BF operation, but ultimately there is a hard limit in decarbonization, associated with the need for C as a chemical reductant. Since the 1950s,...

Coal for Pulverized Coal Injection in Blast Furnace...

Coal for Pulverized Coal Injection in Blast Furnace Injection of pulverized coal in the blast furnace (BF) was initially driven by high oil prices but now the use of pulverized coal injection (PCI) has  become a standard practice in the operation of a BF since it satisfy the requirement of reducing raw material costs, pollution and also satisfy the need to extend the life of ageing coke ovens. The injection of the pulverized coal into the BF results into (i) increase in the productivity of the BF, i.e. the amount of hot metal (HM) produced per day by the BF, (ii) reduce the consumption of the more expensive coking coals by replacing coke with cheaper soft coking or thermal coals, (iii) assist in maintaining furnace stability, (iv) improve the consistency of the quality of the HM and reduce its silicon (Si) content, and (v) reduce greenhouse gas emissions. In addition to these advantages, use of the PCI in the BF has proved to be a powerful tool in the hands of the furnace operator to adjust the thermal condition of the furnace much faster than what is possible by adjusting the burden charge from the top. Schematic diagram of a BF tuyere showing a pulverized coal injection lance is at Fig 1. Fig 1 Schematic diagram of a BF tuyere showing a pulverized coal injection lance Several types of coals are being used for PCI in the BF. In principle, all types of coals can be used for injection in BF, but coking coals are not used for injection since they are costly, have lower availability and are needed for the production of coke. Also, if coking coals are used for injections in BF, They lead to tuyere coking. Hence, coals used for injection...

Production of Ferro-Silicon Jun27

Production of Ferro-Silicon...

Production of Ferro-Silicon Ferro-silicon (Fe-Si) is a ferro-alloy having iron (Fe) and silicon (Si) as its main elements. The ferro-alloy normally contains Si in the range of 15 % to 90 %. The usual Si contents in the Fe-Si available in the market are 15 %, 45 %, 65 %, 75 %, and 90 %. The remainder is Fe, with around 2 % of other elements like aluminum (Al) and calcium (Ca). Fe-Si is produced industrially by carbo-thermic reduction of silicon dioxide (SiO2) with carbon (C) in the presence of iron ore, scrap iron, mill scale, or other source of iron. The smelting of Fe-Si is a continuous process carried out in the electric submerged arc furnace (SAF) with the self-baking electrodes. Fe-Si (typical qualities 65%, 75% and 90% silicon) is mainly used during steelmaking and in foundries for the production of C steels, stainless steels as a deoxidizing agent and for the alloying of steel and cast iron. It is also used for the production of silicon steel also called electrical steel. During the production of cast iron, Fe-Si is also used for inoculation of the iron to accelerate graphitization. In arc welding Fe-Si can be found in some electrode coatings. The ideal reduction reaction during the production of Fe-Si silicon is SiO2+2C=Si+2CO. However the real reaction is quite complex due to the different temperature zones inside the SAF. The gas in the hottest zone has a high content of silicon mono oxide (SiO) which is required to be recovered in the outer charge layers if the recovery of Si is to be high. The recovery reactions occur in the outer charge layers where they heat the charge to a very high temperature. The outlet gas form the furnace contains SiO2 which can...

Development of Smelting Reduction Processes for Ironmaking Mar08

Development of Smelting Reduction Processes for Ironmaking...

Development of Smelting Reduction Processes for Ironmaking Smelting reduction (SR) processes are the most recent development in the production technology of hot metal (liquid iron). These processes combine the gasification of non-coking coal with the melt reduction of iron ore. Energy intensity of SR processes is lower than that of blast furnace (BF), since the production of coke is not needed and the need for preparation of iron ore is also reduced. SR ironmaking process was conceived in the late 1930s. The history of the development of SR processes goes back to the 1950s. The laboratory scale fundamental studies on the SR of iron ore were started first by Dancy in 1951. However, serious efforts started from 1980 onwards. There have been two separate lines of development of primary ironmaking technology during the second half of twentieth century. The first line of development was centred on the BF which remained the principal process unit for the hot metal production. In general, this line of the development did not encompass any radical process changes in the furnace itself. It proceeded through a gradual evolution which involved (i) increase in the furnace size, (ii) improvement in the burden preparation, (iii) increase in the top pressure, (iv) increase of hot blast temperature, (v) bell-less charging and improvements in burden distribution, (vi) improvements in refractories and cooling systems, (vii) injection of auxiliary fuels (fuel gas, liquid fuel, or pulverized coal) and enrichment of hot air blast with oxygen (O2), and (viii) application of automation as well as improvements in instrumentation and control technology. The continued success of the ironmaking in BF reflects the very high levels of thermal and chemical efficiencies which can be achieved during the production of hot metal and the consequent cost advantages. In fact,...