Factors affecting Lining Life of a Basic Oxygen Converter Sep20

Factors affecting Lining Life of a Basic Oxygen Converter...

Factors affecting Lining Life of a Basic Oxygen Converter The life, reliability and costs of lining in a basic oxygen converter are vital for the smooth operations of the steel melting shop utilizing basic oxygen process for steel production.  Higher lining life results into improved availability of the converter which in turn improves its productivity. Three important factors for achieving higher lining life of the basic oxygen converter (Fig 1) are (i) qualities of refractories and their laying pattern in the converter, (ii) operating practices followed, and (iii) monitoring of the lining wear and practices for the maintenance of the refractory lining. Development of improved refractory materials in combination with improved process control and better maintenance during campaigns make it possible to increase the lining life of the basic oxygen converter. Fig 1 Factors affecting lining life of the basic oxygen converter These days without exception, basic oxygen converters are lined with magnesia – carbon (MgO-C) refractories because of their superior properties than other types of converter lining materials. However zoned refractory lining practices are followed by using MgO-C refractories of different qualities in different areas of the converter. The causes of wear of refractories in the basic oxygen converter are either due to chemical reasons or due to the physical reasons. Chemical causes for the wear of the converter lining are mainly due to gaseous materials (oxidizing gases, reducing gases, and water vapour), liquid materials (slag. hot metal, and liquid steel melt), and solid materials (fluxes, and carbon disintegration).  Physical causes for the wear of the converter lining are excessive temperatures (poor dissipation, and hot spots), static mechanical stresses (spalling, and expansion), and dynamic mechanical stresses (abrasion, impact, and vibrations). The key wear mechanisms of the refractory lining of basic oxygen converter can...

Quality of Lime for Steelmaking in Converter Sep08

Quality of Lime for Steelmaking in Converter...

Quality of Lime for Steelmaking in Converter Lime is a white crystalline solid with a melting point of 2572 deg C. It is a basic oxide and is used to react with the acidic oxides (e.g. silica). It is calcium oxide (CaO) produced on heating (calcination) of limestone (CaCO3) to a temperature of 900 deg C and above (usually 1100 deg C). CaCO3(s) + heat = CaO(s) + CO2 (g) This reaction is reversible. Calcium oxide reacts with carbon dioxide to form calcium carbonate. The reaction is driven to the right by flushing of carbon dioxide from the mixture as it is released. Hydrated lime Ca(OH)2 is formed by reaction of lime with water (slaking). Hydrated lime is also known as slaked lime. CaO + H2O = Ca(OH)2 + heat Lime as a basic flux in steel production and it plays an important role in the sequence of metallurgical reactions taking place in a converter. Steel is produced from hot metal by oxidizing sulphur (S), phosphorus (P), carbon (C), silicon (Si), manganese (Mn), and other impurities so that they can enter the slag or gas phases, thus separating from the metal phase. Lime in steelmaking is mainly used to produce slag for the removal of these harmful elements in liquid bath and optimize the quality of liquid steel. The basic oxygen process oxidizes impurities in an oxygen converter also known as basic oxygen furnace (BOF) where the hot metal comes in contact with oxygen. Oxidized impurities of the hot metal are absorbed in a slag, which is formed with the help of calcined lime. Metallurgical lime in the fifties consisted of a mixture of particles of all sizes from very coarse to very fine, with additional components such as silicon dioxide and sulphur concentrated...

Slag and its Role in Blast Furnace Ironmaking Aug07

Slag and its Role in Blast Furnace Ironmaking...

Slag and its Role in Blast Furnace Ironmaking Blast furnace (BF) is the oldest (more than 700 years old) of the various reactors which are being used in the steel plants. It is used for the production of liquid iron (hot metal). The blast furnace is a complex high temperature counter current reactor and is in the shape of a shaft in which iron bearing materials (ore, sinter/pellet) and coke are alternately charged at the top along with flux materials (limestone, dolomite etc.) to create a layered burden in the furnace. Preheated air is blown in from the lower part of the furnace through tuyeres. This hot air reacts with the coke to produce reducing gases. Descending ore burden (iron oxides) is reduced by the ascending reducing gases and is melted to produce hot metal. The gangue materials and coke ash melt to form slag with the fluxing materials. The liquid products (hot metal and slag) are drained out (tapped) from the furnace at certain intervals through the tap hole. The quality of hot metal obtained is dependent on the formation of the slag and its mineralogical transformations. A good quality slag is necessary for a quality hot metal. The slag is a mixture of low melting chemical compounds formed by the chemical reaction of the gangue of the iron bearing burden and coke ash with the flux materials in the charge. All unreduced compounds such as silicates, aluminosilicates, and calcium alumino silicate etc. also join the slag. It is well known that the components of slag namely silica (SiO2) and alumina (Al2O3) increase the viscosity whereas the presence of calcium oxide reduces the viscosity. The melting zone of slag determines the cohesive zone of blast furnace and hence the fluidity and melting characteristics...

Role of Slag in Converter Steelmaking Aug01

Role of Slag in Converter Steelmaking...

Role of Slag in Converter Steelmaking The oxygen converter process is the primary steelmaking process for the production of carbon and low-alloy steels. The process is essentially an oxidizing process of refining of the high carbon hot metal (HM) to low carbon liquid steel. The oxidizing process is carried out by blowing oxygen in the converter. This causes liquid iron and the other metallic and non-metallic impurities present in the liquid melt in the converter bath to form oxides that are lighter than the liquid steel and they float to the surface of the bath. The generic name of these oxides is ‘slag’. Some oxides are acidic in nature which can react with the basic refractories of the converter and hence a basic slag using lime and calcined dolomite is usually made for protecting the converter refractories. The oxygen can also react with carbon to create a gas that provides bubbles for foaming the liquid slag and for providing chemical energy needed during steelmaking. In steelmaking process, the slag is predominantly a mixture of oxides with small amounts of sulphides and phosphides. The oxides are either acidic or basic in nature. Slag is formed during refining of hot metal in which Si oxidizes to SiO2, Mn to MnO, Fe to FeO, and P to P2O5 etc., and addition of oxides such as CaO (lime), MgO (calcined dolomite), iron oxide, and others. The addition of oxides is done to obtain desired physico-chemical properties of slag like melting point, basicity, viscosity etc. There are four primary sources for the slag during the steelmaking process in the converter. These are (i) oxidation of metallic elements in the liquid steel (e.g. silicon, manganese, aluminum, titanium, chromium, and vanadium etc.), (ii) due to presence of non-metallics in the liquid...

High Alumina Slag and Blast Furnace Operation May27

High Alumina Slag and Blast Furnace Operation...

High Alumina Slag and Blast Furnace Operation Blast furnace (BF) process of iron making is a process where liquid iron (hot metal) and liquid slag are produced by the reduction of iron bearing materials (sinter and/or pellet and lump ore) with coke and by fluxing of the gangue material of the feed materials. The process is the result of a series of chemical reactions which takes place in the blast furnace. The separation of slag from the hot metal takes place in liquid state. Slag has a lower melting point and is lighter than hot metal. In the blast furnace it is at a higher temperature than the hot metal. Blast furnace slag contain predominantly silica (SiO2), alumina (Al2O3), lime (CaO) and magnesia (MgO) along with smaller amounts of FeO, MnO, TiO2, Na2O, K2O and S. Blast furnace (BF) slag composition has very important bearing on its physicochemical characteristics which influences to a great degree the smooth operation of the blast furnace, slag handling, coke consumption, blast furnace productivity and the quality of the hot metal. Low alumina slag normally has low viscosity, high sulphide capacity and low liquidus temperature as compared to high alumina slag. Blast furnace slag alumina (Al2O3) is mainly dependent on the alumina content of the input materials mainly iron ore. In those cases where iron ore alumina is less than 1 % the alumina content in the slag hardly goes above 10 %. But in some iron ores (normally found in India) alumina content is 2 % and higher. Such ores raise the alumina levels in blast furnace slag to 20 % and higher. To operate a blast furnace with such high alumina slag is quite difficult and need a different type of skill from the blast furnace operators...