Negotiation skills for effective negotiations...

Negotiation skills for effective negotiations  It is inevitable that, from time-to-time, conflict and disagreement can arise due to the differing needs, wants, aims and beliefs of the people who are brought together.  Without negotiations, such conflicts may lead to argument and resentment resulting in one or all the parties feeling dissatisfied. Negotiation is normally done so as to reach agreement without causing future barriers to communications. Negotiation takes place when two or more people/parties, with differing views, come together to attempt to reach agreement on an issue. It is persuasive communication or bargaining. Negotiation is a cooperative process whereby participants try to find a solution which meets the legitimate interests of the negotiating parties. It is the process between two or more parties to settle differences. In the process of negotiation parties try to reach compromise or agreement while avoiding argument and dispute. In case of any disagreement, parties understandably aim to achieve the best possible outcome for their position (or perhaps an organization they represent). However, the principles of fairness, seeking mutual benefit and maintaining a relationship are the keys to a successful outcome. The word ‘negotiation’ originated from the Latin expression, ‘negotiatus’, which means ‘to carry on business’.  Negotiating is the process of communicating back and forth, for the purpose of reaching a joint agreement about differing needs or ideas. It is a collection of behaviours that involves negotiation skills, communication, sales, marketing, psychology, sociology, assertiveness and conflict resolution. A method of negotiation is usually judged by three criteria namely (i) it should produce wise agreement if agreement is possible, (ii) it should be efficient, and (iii) it should improve or at least not damage the relationship between the parties. Negotiations are viewed ‘hard’ where the participants are adversaries, the goal is victory, there is...