Ironmaking by Blast Furnace and Carbon di Oxide Emissions Jan14

Ironmaking by Blast Furnace and Carbon di Oxide Emissions...

Ironmaking by Blast Furnace and Carbon di Oxide Emissions It is widely recognised that carbon di-oxide (CO2) in the atmosphere is the main component influencing global warming through the green-house effect. Since 1896 the concentration of CO2 in the atmosphere has increased by 25 %. The iron and steel industry is known as an energy intensive industry and as a significant emitter of CO2. Hence, climate change is identified by the iron and steel industry as a major environmental challenge. Long before the findings of the Inter-governmental Panel on Climate Change in 2007, major producers of iron and steel recognized that long term solutions are needed to tackle the CO2 emissions from the iron and steel industry. Therefore, the iron and steel industry has been highly proactive in improving energy consumption and reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. In the present environment of the climate change, within the iron and steel industry, there is a constant drive to reduce energy costs, reduce emissions and ensure maximum waste energy re-use. In the traditional processes for producing iron and steel, emission of CO2 is inevitable, especially for the blast furnace (BF) process, which requires carbon (C) as a fuel and reducing agent to convert iron oxide to the metallic state, and hence is the main process for the generation of CO2 in an integrated iron and steel plant. Climate policy is in fact, an important driver for further development of the ironmaking technology by BF. Critically, amongst the challenges facing the BF operation is decarbonization. Significant steps have been made by the iron and steel industry to increase the thermal efficiency of the BF operation, but ultimately there is a hard limit in decarbonization, associated with the need for C as a chemical reductant. Since the 1950s,...

Coal Tar and its Distillation Processes Dec26

Coal Tar and its Distillation Processes...

Coal Tar and its Distillation Processes Coal tar, also known as crude tar, is the by-product generated during the high temperature carbonizing of coking coal for the production of the metallurgical coke in the by-product coke ovens. It is a black, viscous, sometimes semi-solid, fluid of peculiar smell, which is condensed together with aqueous ‘gas-liquor’ (ammoniacal liquor), when the volatile products of the carbonization of coking coal are cooled down. It is acidic in nature and is water insoluble. It is composed primarily of a complex mixture of condensed-ring aromatic hydrocarbons. It can contain phenolic compounds, aromatic nitrogen (N2) bases and their alkyl derivatives, and paraffinic and olefinic hydrocarbons. In the process of coal carbonization the constituents of the tar escape from the coke ovens in the form of vapour, with a little solid free carbon (C) in an extremely finely divided state. The tar is precipitated in the hydraulic main, in the condensers, and scrubbers etc., in a liquid state, at the same time as the ammoniacal liquor is formed. The tar formed in the hydraulic main is, of course, poorer in the more volatile products than that formed in the condensers and scrubbers, and is consequently much thicker than the latter. The normal yield of coal tar during the coal carbonizing process is around 4 %. Coal tar has a specific gravity normally in the range of 1.12 to 1.20, but exceptionally it can go upto 1.25. It depends on the temperature of carbonization. The lower specific gravity tars are generally produced when low carbonization temperatures are used. Viscosity of tar affected similarly. The heavier tars contain lesser benzol than the lighter tars, and more fixed carbon. The nature of the raw material and the temperature of carbonization affect the chemical composition,...

Coking Pressure Phenomena and its Influencing Factors Dec17

Coking Pressure Phenomena and its Influencing Factors...

Coking Pressure Phenomena and its Influencing Factors Coking pressure is a phenomenon which has become important because of the use of the double-heated wall, vertical, slot-type coke ovens. In the round beehive ovens as well in the heat recovery coke ovens, which are also being used for coke production, the coal can freely expand upwards and thus the swelling of the charge is accommodated by this free expansion. On the other hand, in the slot-type coke ovens, the expansion of the coal horizontally to the heated wall is restricted. There are several cases of premature failure of oven walls during the coal carbonization process. The erection of the new, larger and taller coke ovens has been accompanied by undesirable occurrences of distorted walls due to the coking pressure resulting in several studies regarding the expansion behaviour of coal during carbonization. The efforts have been focused on developing a reliable test so that coal blends can be tested for safety prior to their use in the coke ovens. Development of coking pressure During carbonization process, coal passes through the plastic stage and volatile matter (VM) evolves during and, to a lesser extent, after that stage. It is normally accepted that coking pressure arises in the plastic stage. In a coke oven chamber, two vertical plastic layers parallel to the heating walls are formed from the beginning of carbonization. As the carbonization proceeds these layers move towards the centre of the oven. At the same time, similar horizontal layers are formed at the top and bottom of the charge. These are joined with the two vertical layers and the whole forms a continuous region that surrounds the uncarbonized coal and it is usually referred to as the ‘plastic envelope’. The permeability of the plastic layers is...

Coal Carbonization for Coke Production Dec08

Coal Carbonization for Coke Production...

Coal Carbonization for Coke Production Coal carbonization is the process by which coal is heated and volatile products (liquid and gaseous) are driven off, leaving a solid residue called coke. Carbonization of coal involves heating coal to high temperatures either in the absence of oxygen (O2) or in control quantity of O2. A gaseous by-product referred to as coke oven gas (COG) along with ammonia (NH3), water, and sulphur compounds are also thermally removed from the coal. The coke which remains after this distillation largely consists of carbon (C), in various crystallographic forms, but also contains the thermally modified remains of various minerals which have been in the original coal. These mineral remains, usually referred to as coke ash, do not burn and are left as a residue after the coke is burned. Until recently, the carbonization of coal was considered as ‘destructive distillation’, but with the increased importance of the products of carbonization, this phrase is falling out of use. Now, the coal carbonization is considered to be a physico-chemical process which depends on the coking rate, operating parameters, coal blend properties and the transport of thermal energy. The heating rate of coal influences the strength and the fissuring properties of coke. In order to arrive at a homogeneous quality, the heating of the coal cake in a coke oven is therefore to be uniform over the total length and height of the oven. In addition to this, the plastic layer migration rate influences the level of thermal stress in the re-solidified mass and therefore, the level of fissuring. The coal carbonization process started at the beginning of the 18th century by carbonizing good quality of coking coal in heaps on the ground, which subsequently led to the development of beehive ovens of...

Theory and Practice of Sintering of Iron ore Nov25

Theory and Practice of Sintering of Iron ore...

Theory and Practice of Sintering of Iron ore Sintering of iron ore is a generic term which is used to describe the process whereby a sinter mix (raw mix or green mix) of iron ore fines, fluxes, fuel (coke breeze) and plant return fines (e.g. mill scale, blast furnace dust, and returned sinter fines etc.) are converted into a particular form of agglomerate. It consists of heating the sinter mix with a particle size of less than 10 mm to such a temperature that surface of each grain of the charge mix starts to melt and the formed melt creates liquid bridges between grains, which, after solidification, ensure formation of a solid porous material called sinter having a screened size normally of 5 mm to 30 mm (upper size can go upto 50 mm to suits local requirements), and which can withstand operating pressure and temperature environment inside the blast furnace (BF). The process of sintering is a thermal operation involving melting and assimilation reactions. The first stage of the sintering process is the formation of the melt which involves the reaction between fine iron ore particles and fluxes. The initial melt is generated from adhering fines during heating via reaction between iron ore and fluxes. Then, nucleus particles are partially assimilated or dissolved into the primary melt to form more melt. Before complete melting is achieved, the sintering temperature drops due to the short residence time at the maximum temperature and then the melt solidifies and mineral phases precipitate, resulting in the formation of the bonding phases. During the sintering process, the chemical reactions are taking place at high temperature and the iron ore and fluxes are combined together and form a sinter cake composed of iron ore, silico-ferrites of calcium and aluminum...

Waste Plastics injection in a Blast Furnace Nov14

Waste Plastics injection in a Blast Furnace...

Waste Plastics injection in a Blast Furnace The recycling of waste plastics (WP) by injecting them in a blast furnace (BF) is being practiced in few BFs especially in japan and Europe. The use of plastics in the BF also recovers energy from the WP and so it is sometimes considered as energy recovery. BF based ironmaking processes can utilize WP by any of the following methods. Carbonization with coal to produce coke. Top charging into the BF, although this generates unwanted tar from the decomposition of the plastics in the shaft. Gasifying the plastics outside the BF. The resultant synthesis gas is then injected through the tuyeres. Injection as a solid through the tuyeres in a similar way to pulverized coal (PC). Normally it is done as a co-injection of WP and coal into the BF. The first attempt for the waste plastics injection (WPI) in a BF was made at the Bremen Steel Works in 1994, with commercial injection starting a year later. The first integrated system for injecting plastic wastes was at NKK’s (now JFE Steel) Keihin Works in Japan. Injecting WP into BF has several environmental, operational and economic advantages. These include the following. Reduction in the amount of plastic wastes being landfilled or incinerated. Lower consumption of both coke and PC, thus saving coal resources. However, neither WP nor PC can completely replace coke. The amount of coke replaced in the BF is partly dependent on the quality of the WP. There is energy resource savings. The benefit of saved resources from mixed WPI is around 11 giga calories per ton (Gcal/t). There is decrease in the carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions since the combustion energy of WP is generally at least as high as that of PC normally injected,...