Ammonium Sulphate – A By-product of Coal Coking Process...

Ammonium Sulphate – A By-product of Coal Coking Process Ammonium sulphate is produced as a by-product during removal of ammonia (NH3) from the raw coke oven gas generated during the coking of the metallurgical coal in by-product coke ovens. Its industrial production began over a century ago, as by-product in gas cleaning in coke and coal gasification plants. Ammo­nium sulphate is produced as crystals. It is an organic, white odorless solid and crystalline salt with a number of commercial uses. It contains around 21% nitrogen (N2) and 24% sulphur (S). The Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS) registry number for ammonium sulphate is 7783–20–2. Its EC number is 231-984-1. Its IUPAC ID is Diazanium sulfate. It is currently classifiable under Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (HTSUS) subheading 3102.21.0000. This process by which ammonium sulphate is produced consists of absorption of ammonia in the coke oven gas in a solution of ammonium sulphate and sulphuric acid. The absorption reaction is 2NH3 + H2SO4 = (NH4)2SO4. The ammonium sulphate produced by the reaction of NH3 with H2SO4 is recovered by crystallization. The crystals are then centrifuged, washed and dried. Since ammonium sulphate is produced as a by-product during the recovery of ammonia from coke oven gas, there are normally a lot of impurities from different sources. These are organic impurities as well as the inorganic impurities. The combined effects of these impurities are complex and influence the purity and the crystal shape and size. Ammonium sulphate is available in a variety of grades, including granular and standard grades. Granular grade accounts for the vast majority of the market.  Its relatively large particle size (typically 2.5 mm) makes it well suited for mixing with other fertilizers and application by spreading machines.  Standard grade has a smaller particle size (less than 2 mm) and...

Management of Organizational Growth...

Management of Organizational Growth Organizational growth is not automatic. It does not follow from success. Of course, it needs organization to have the right products or services for the right markets at the right time. But this is a requirement for growth, a necessary condition, rather than growth itself. Growth of an organization is full of stress and strain. It causes discontinuity. It makes the organization to change itself. It can create identity crisis as there is transition from old stage to new stage. Even the ablest, the brightest, the most highly motivated organization can suffer the worst identity crisis. For an organization to be able to grow smoothly and without trouble, it is to be carefully prepared for growth, trained for growth, and directed towards growth. The management can prepare the organization for growth by thinking big the way IBM has done it in the mid twentieth century. The IBM management adopted a impressive name,’ International Business Machines’, at a time when IBM was neither international nor truly business machines. IBM created an organizational image through distinctive design and distinctive typography for its products, its publications, and its communications inside and outside the organization. It invented the slogan ‘think’ and distributed hundreds of thousands of ‘think’ posters and stickers to its employees and customers. From very early days IBM had developed and trained a human organization which was to look upon itself as select force and which was prepared to manage a very much bigger organization. The management had insisted that the employees take responsibility for their own work and thus trained a whole cadre of proud and competent workforce which became the skeleton around which the much bigger IBM workforce of later years was built. Above all, the management trained, and trained,...

Recovery of Ammonia during Production of Coke from Coking Coal Jan26

Recovery of Ammonia during Production of Coke from Coking Coal...

Recovery of Ammonia during Production of Coke from Coking Coal Ammonia (NH3) is a by-product produced during the production of coke from coking coal in the by-product coke ovens. It is a constituent of the coke oven gas (COG) leaving the coke ovens, with a typical concentration in raw COG of 6 grams per normal cubic meters (g/N cum). The solubility of NH3 in water leads to its presence in the flushing liquor of coke oven battery (COB) with a typical concentration of 5 grams per litre (g/l) to 6 g/l of total NH3. Therefore, due to the net production of flushing liquor in the COB, also sometimes being referred to as excess flushing liquor, there arises a liquid stream as well as a gas stream from which NH3 is required to be removed. The quantity of excess liquor is around 12 % of the dry coal throughput, which depends on the coal moisture content. Removal of NH3 from the gas stream is a universal feature of a coke oven and by-product plant. This is because NH3, in the presence of the other COG contaminants hydrogen cyanide (HCN), hydrogen sulphide (H2S), oxygen (O2), and water, is extremely corrosive to pipelines made of carbon steel. Also, when ammonia is uncontrollably burnt in any combustion chamber, it forms nitrogen oxides (NOx) which causes air pollution. Hence, removal of NH3 from COG and liquid stream is required to be also done due to environmental reasons. The primary NH3 handling process in the coke oven and by-product plant deals with the removal and disposal of the NH3 present in the COG. However, NH3 recovery systems often include facilities to handle the NH3 arising in the excess flushing liquor. For proper understanding of how these facilities are incorporated into...

Hydrogen gas and its use in Iron and Steel industry...

Hydrogen gas and its use in Iron and Steel industry Hydrogen is a chemical element, ranking first in the periodic table with element symbol of ‘H’. The (atomic number of hydrogen element is 1 and atomic weight is 1.008. It is the smallest atom in the universe and the simplest element in nature. Its molecule consists of two hydrogen atoms. It is the lightest gas, being about 1/14 times as dense as air. It has three isotopes named (i) protium, (ii) deuterium, and (iii) tritium. Pure hydrogen is odourless, colourless and tasteless. Hydrogen has lowest atomic weight of any substance and therefore has very low density both as a gas and a liquid. The vapour density of hydrogen at 20 deg C and 1 atmosphere pressure is 0.08376 kg/cum. The specific gravity of gaseous hydrogen is 0.0696 and hence, it has around 7 % the density of air. The density of liquid hydrogen at normal boiling point and 1 atmosphere pressure is 70.8 kg/cum. The specific gravity of liquid hydrogen is 0.0708 and is thus, it has around 7 % the density of water. Hydrogen is a liquid below its boiling point of -253 deg C and a solid below its melting point of – 259 deg C at atmospheric pressure. It is non-toxic but can act as a simple asphyxiant by displacing the oxygen in the air. When hydrogen is stored as a high-pressure gas at 250 kg/cum and atmospheric temperature, its expansion ratio to atmospheric pressure is 1:240. The molecules of hydrogen gas are smaller than all other gases, and it can diffuse through many materials considered airtight or impermeable to other gases. This property makes hydrogen more difficult to contain than other gases. Leaks of liquid hydrogen evaporate very quickly since the...

Worker, Work, and Working...

Worker, Work, and Working Work is related to the worker’s consciousness since ages. Systematic, purposeful, and organized approach to work is specific and unique human activity. In fact, work is a matter of a deep concern for both the management and the workers. It is important since it is central to the organizational performance. All the economic and social theories made earlier have focus on the work, since it is the means of production needed by the society. Though the work has been central to the human activity all along, organized study of work has not begun till the later period of the 19th century. Frederick W. Taylor was the first person in the recorded history who considered that the work deserves systematic observation and study. Taylor’s ‘scientific management’ which is the science of work, laid only the first foundations. In the scientific management of work, the worker is given less attention, and the knowledge worker receives even lesser attention. There has been plenty of loud thinking, but serious, systematic study has been confined only to a few aspects of working. There has been ‘industrial physiology, dealing with the relationship of such things as lighting, tool and machine speeds, design of the work place, and so on, to the human being who is the worker. To this effect, the fundamental work was done in the early years of 20th century, such as the fatigue and vision studies. Then, there has been ‘ industrial psychology’ which focuses on the aptitudes, that is, the relationship between the demands of specific manual work and the physical skill, mechanical coordination, and reactions of individual workers. Finally, there has been development with respect to human relations, which is, the study of the relationship between people working together, though in...